Adam White

Adam White

Adam White is Production Editor of Inkstone. The Hong Kong­-born-and-raised journalist and editor has written for CNN, Time, Monocle, HK Magazine and the New Statesman.

The face of a transforming megacity
Photographer Tim Franco first arrived in the southwestern Chinese city of Chongqing in the mid-2000s to document a city that was exploding. In the late 2000s, the city’s population of some 30 million was overwhelmingly rural, with only about a third of the population living in the urban areas. The government set its sights on reversing the trend, aiming to double the city’s urban population to 20 million by 2020, investing huge sums in construction to lure people to the city. Franco’s project, Metamorpolis, documents six years of a changing Chongqing, Check out our gallery, above, to see how this Chinese megacity transformed in less than a decade. In Hong Kong? Franco’s photos are showing at
The face of a transforming megacity
Making China green again
In the late 1950s, Mao Zedong had a plan for China: a rapid overhaul of the economy, transforming it from a nation of farmers to a socialist country of industry. It was termed the Great Leap Forward, and its wide-ranging heavy-handed policies are estimated to have led to millions of deaths. The campaign had another, unforeseen circumstance. To provide fuel for the vast furnaces needed to produce low-quality steel, the nation embarked upon a huge logging exercise that stripped mountains and entire regions bare. Decades later, that’s led to increasing desertification of the country, bringing in hostile sandstorms and chasing people from their homes. But in recent years the country has been wor
Making China green again
Partying with the president at the Hong Kong Sevens
The weekend saw Hong Kong’s flagship sporting event sweep into town. The city’s Rugby Sevens saw 40 teams from across the world compete in this fast-paced 7-a-side game. But as ever, most of the action was off the pitch – especially in the infamous South Stand of Hong Kong Stadium, where revelers dress up and drink all day – and maybe occasionally catch a bit of the rugby. The South China Morning Post’s photographers caught a glimpse of the action. Check out our gallery, above, for more.
Partying with the president at the Hong Kong Sevens
Paper for the dead
April 5 is Ching Ming or Qing Ming, China’s annual tomb-sweeping festival. On this day, Chinese people visit their ancestors’ graves to tend to the sites and perform rites of remembrance. Part of the process is the burning of paper effigies, which the Chinese believe will “transfer” to the afterlife. Reuters photographer Jason Lee visited a wholesale market selling paper effigies in Mibeizhuang, China’s northern province of Hebei. Check out our gallery, above, to see more.
Paper for the dead
Dragon dancing in the schoolyard
The town of Longji, in China’s southwestern Guizhou province, dates back some 600 years. In an area populated primarily by ethnic minorities, Longji began life as a military garrison for the northern Han Chinese ethnic group, who were ruling the country. Now, with China’s Communist Party pushing ahead to forge a greater sense of national identity, students are learning the old ways in Longji – such as its ancient dragon dance, performed by dancers with painted faces. Xinhua photographer Ou Dongqu went to capture the lords of the dance – and the students.
Dragon dancing in the schoolyard
Stylin’ Beijing
The Fall/Winter edition of China Fashion Week has just wrapped up in Beijing. The week-long event, which has been running for some 22 years, saw designers from across China present their work to the world. Check out our gallery, above, for a taste.
Stylin’ Beijing
Hong Kong holds its artsiest week
Art Week has arrived in Hong Kong. The week sees a series of art exhibitions, fairs and events across the city, all planned to coincide with Art Basel Hong Kong, the city’s flagship art fair. The seventh edition of the fair host 242 galleries from 35 regions. It’s expected to bring in some 80,000 visitors, here to window-shop the latest in the contemporary art world – or here to spend big. China has a big appetite for art. According to Art Basel and UBS, it is currently the world’s third-largest art market after the US and the UK, and accounts for 20% of the world’s total art sales. In 2007, Chinese buyers made up 9% of sales. Check out our gallery, above, to see some of the best of Art Week
Hong Kong holds its artsiest week
From China’s first Coke, to tanks in Tiananmen, to Dior in Shanghai
Photojournalist Liu Heung Shing moved home to China after the death in 1976 of Mao Zedong. He sensed a shift on the horizon. Over a 40 year career as a news photographer for media organizations including Time, Life and the Associated Press, he captured the fall of the Soviet Union – for which he won a Pulitzer Prize – and China’s own tumultuous opening up to the outside world, from economic development to the bloody Tiananmen Square crackdown. Liu is set to release A Life in a Sea of Red, a book of his award-winning work from China and Russia, in Hong Kong during the Art Basel fair this month. Check out our gallery, above, for a glimpse of his spectacular work. See Liu’s work through April 1
From China’s first Coke, to tanks in Tiananmen, to Dior in Shanghai
Hong Kong harbor gets an inflatable visitor
Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour has a lazy new inhabitant: a 121-foot-long inflatable mouse… thing. The blow-up monster is the work of American street artist Kaws, and is in town to coincide with the city’s Art Month. Having visited Seoul and Taipei, Kaws: Holiday arrived in Victoria Harbour on Friday after a few days of checking out the rest of Hong Kong.
Hong Kong harbor gets an inflatable visitor
China in pink
It’s cherry blossom season in China. For a few brief weeks, the country’s cherry trees bloom into beautiful pinks, lilacs and whites. But of course, the flowers don’t just attract the birds and the bees: they also bring in the selfie-hungry hordes.
China in pink