Alvin Lum

Alvin Lum

Political journalist covering in Hong Kong politics, justice system and policy analysis.

Alvin is a contributor to Inkstone. He reports on politics and the law for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong politics, Hong Kong justice system, policy analysis
Top students debate Hong Kong. Then they want nothing to do with it
Would China grant Hong Kong universal suffrage? This is a question that some participants in the world’s largest university debating tournament do not want to be associated with. At the World Universities Debating Championships (WUDC), a motion on Hong Kong democracy has caused a stir. Mainland Chinese spectators were said to have walked out, while the winning team asked for their names to be removed from the record.  Four teams, from Oxford University, Yale University, the University of Belgrade in Serbia and Macquarie University in Australia, were competing in the final round of WUDC 2020 held in Thailand on January 3.  But after the motion “This House, as China, would grant universal suff
Top students debate Hong Kong. Then they want nothing to do with it
Foreign experts quit watchdog group investigating Hong Kong police
Foreign experts advising Hong Kong’s police watchdog have abruptly announced they will “stand aside” from an ongoing review of officers’ actions during the anti-government protests. Last month, the five-member panel of overseas experts convened by the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) said the watchdog should be given more powers to conduct its own investigation over officers’ conduct during the protests. But council chairman Anthony Neoh, who had enlisted the members, all international experts with years of experience in policing and crowd behavior, rejected their proposal. In an interview with a mainland Chinese media organization, Neoh criticized them for a lack of understandin
Foreign experts quit watchdog group investigating Hong Kong police
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
Visitors and staff trying to enter a university in Hong Kong that was the site of a fiery battle between protesters and police this week have encountered a makeshift checkpoint. Protesters wearing black who guard the booth – made of bamboo sticks, umbrellas and a door from a trashed car – have roughly searched through any visitor belongings and questioned the purpose of their visit to the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) in Sha Tin. A plank at the checkpoint has the words “CU arrival” scrawled on it. The protesters claimed their intention was to prevent plain-clothes police officers from getting onto the campus, but it has resulted in many people, especially university staff, feeling d
Bracing for clashes: Hong Kong protesters turn college campus into fortress
‘Hongkongers, revenge’: Student’s death prompts outpouring of grief and anger
Thousands of people across Hong Kong took to the streets, shopping malls and campuses on Friday to mourn a student who died from a fall during a clash between the police and protesters. Mourners joined impromptu rallies in the hours following the death of Chow Tsz-lok, a college student who fell from a parking lot on Monday while riot police dispersed crowds with tear gas nearby.  Hundreds of office workers marched in the Central business district, many wearing masks in defiance of a government ban on face covering and vowing to seek justice. “Blood for blood,” some marchers shouted. “Hongkongers, revenge.” The development could escalate tension in a city that has been rocked since June by
‘Hongkongers, revenge’: Student’s death prompts outpouring of grief and anger
Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong barred from election
Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has been banned from running in local elections next month, a move that could further fuel public anger at the city’s limited democracy underpinning months of social unrest. Wong was the only candidate disqualified from the polls, to be held on November 24, on the basis of his political stance. “The ban is clearly politically driven,” Wong said. “My disqualification will only trigger more people to take to the streets and vote in the coming elections.” Wong is a co-founder of the party Demosisto, whose founding mission is to strive for Hong Kong’s “self-determination.” The former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 under the promise o
Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong barred from election
Lawyer at French bank quits after supporting Hong Kong protests
A lawyer at French bank BNP Paribas in Hong Kong has quit after expressing support for anti-government protests in the city and mocking pro-Chinese supporters on his personal Facebook account. The Facebook post by Jason Ng, who served as legal head of BNP’s debt capital markets, had triggered calls on Chinese social media for a boycott of the bank The resignation of Ng, confirmed by a source with knowledge of the matter, followed an earlier apology from the French bank, saying the remarks “did not reflect the view of BNP Paribas.” Ng declined to comment on his former employer and said it was a private matter. It’s unclear whether he volunteered to quit or was fired. BNP Paribas also decline
Lawyer at French bank quits after supporting Hong Kong protests
Hong Kong spent $1 million on PR blitz. It’s not very effective
The Hong Kong government has spent nearly $1 million on a global advertising campaign to convince the world that all is well in the city, despite the continuing anti-government demonstrations. The city’s authorities told the South China Morning Post that it has spent HK$7.4 million ($943,000) to place ads in newspapers in countries including the US, South Korea and Germany.  But industry experts said the official campaign paled in comparison to the public relations drive by the protesters in terms of both spending and success.  “The campaigns of the activists go beyond paid advertisements, as they earned publicity in media as well on reports of their tactics and creativity,” said Andy Ho On
Hong Kong spent $1 million on PR blitz. It’s not very effective
Can a truth panel inspired by the death of Michael Brown help Hong Kong?
Hong Kong’s leader, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, has said she would appoint a panel of experts to investigate the root causes of the city’s unrest, in a move that a government insider compared to the forming of the Ferguson Commission in the US. The commission was created after violence broke out in Ferguson, Missouri in 2014 after Michael Brown, an 18-year-old black man, was shot dead by a white police officer. The report produced by the 16-member commission eventually made 189 recommendations, ranging from changes in policing, the court system, health care and social services. On Wednesday, in a surprise U-turn, Lam announced she would officially withdraw a controversial extradition bill t
Can a truth panel inspired by the death of Michael Brown help Hong Kong?
US graduate student gives exclusive account of Hong Kong protest
Hundreds of protesters ransacked Hong Kong’s parliament on July 1, the anniversary of the city’s handover to Chinese rule. They broke windows, dismantled furniture and painted graffiti inside the building. Brian Leung Kai-ping, 25 and a graduate student at the University of Washington, was among those who entered the legislature – and the only one who openly revealed his identity that night. The storming made international headlines and marked a “quantum leap” for the entire movement against the extradition bill and the city’s push for democracy, he said. In an exclusive interview with the South China Morning Post, via a Telegram phone call, an app widely used in the movement, he explained w
US graduate student gives exclusive account of Hong Kong protest
Ex-Hong Kong minister found guilty of bribing African officials
A former Hong Kong government minister has been found guilty by a federal jury in New York of offering millions of dollars in bribes to African officials. Patrick Ho Chi-ping, 69, now faces jail time after being convicted Wednesday afternoon by a Southern District of New York jury. Arrested by US authorities in November 2017, Ho was found guilty on seven of eight counts of bribery and money laundering. Prosecutors alleged that he was involved in $2.9 million worth of bribes given to a state leader and officials of Chad and Uganda, in exchange for securing oil rights and development opportunities for Chinese conglomerate CEFC China Energy in the two African countries. Ho was acquitted of the
Ex-Hong Kong minister found guilty of bribing African officials