Amanda Lee

Amanda Lee

Correspondent

Amanda is a contributor to Inkstone. The Beijing-based correspondent covers markets and the economy for the South China Morning Post, with an interest in China's economic and social landscape.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Markets, economy
Made (mostly) in China 2025: Beijing wants to cut reliance on foreign tech
After the Trump administration showed itself willing and capable of blocking Chinese access to US technology as US-China tensions rose, Beijing may have learned. China is aiming to increase its reliance on domestic production for key components, including chips and control systems, to 75% by 2025, according to a former official. The target reflects Beijing’s determination to reduce its dependence on imports by expanding its national manufacturing innovation centers to 40 from the 15 at the end of 2019. Domestic production currently only provides around a third of the key components required by China, but Li Yizhong, a former industry and information technology minister, said this week that t
Made (mostly) in China 2025: Beijing wants to cut reliance on foreign tech
How does the world see China's rise? It's complicated
China’s growing economic strength is seen by most people as positive, but the country’s rise as a global superpower is not making it popular with neighbors in the Asia-Pacific, a survey released on Thursday showed. The survey of nearly 39,000 people in 34 countries by the Pew Research Center also showed the world had an overwhelmingly negative view of Chinese President Xi Jinping. Over the past 70 years, China has transformed itself from an economic backwater to the world’s second-largest economy and a major source of investment around the world. Some 58% of people across 16 countries recognized China’s strong economy as mutually beneficial, while 52% said they see Chinese investment as posi
How does the world see China's rise? It's complicated
China’s massaging of economic data distorts global growth, study says
China’s official economic data over the past four years has been “too smooth to be realistic,” according to a new study by Rhodium Group, a US-based research house. A new report claims that this unrealistic data has led to distortions in global economic growth estimates, which in turn has affected economic policy decision-making throughout the world, especially in China. “There is significant cost to its data smoothing for China itself, which I think is completely under appreciated, based on the expectation that projecting stability is a significant impediment to reform,” said Logan Wright, head of Rhodium Group’s China markets research. “It’s obvious that if there’s not much broken then the
China’s massaging of economic data distorts global growth, study says
China quietly tightened screening of foreign investments
China’s powerful central planning agency quietly had its remit ­expanded last month to govern whether ­foreign investments in the country threaten ­national security. Experts say that the new powers, together with a new article in China’s foreign investment law, enable Beijing to make strong legal cases against American firms investing in the country amid an escalating US-China trade war. China’s National Development and Reform Commission is now charged with reviewing foreign investments to ensure they are in line with “economic security.” The state planner’s authority has been strengthened in the process. This signals a big change in the national security review process for foreign investo
China quietly tightened screening of foreign investments
China refuses to give up its ‘developing’ status, or its perks
China will refuse to give up its status as a developing country at the World Trade Organization, in a rebuke to a US proposal that would pare back the privileges China and other nations enjoy on trade. China declares itself as a developing country at the global trade body, which allows it to subsidize its agricultural producers and set higher barriers to market entry than more developed economies. The dispute reflects a fundamental divide within the WTO that has threatened the future of the global trading system. The United States has long complained that too many WTO members – about two-thirds – define themselves as developing countries to take advantage of the terms the status permits the
China refuses to give up its ‘developing’ status, or its perks
The trade war is hitting China hard in high-tech
It looks like the US-China trade war is having an effect – in the one area China doesn’t want it to. China’s growth rate has slowed overall, but taking a particular hit is Beijing’s “Made in China 2025” plan to dominate high-tech industries in the next decade. A number of advanced manufacturing sectors which China had counted on to upgrade its industry have experienced weakening demand. In December, growth in the new-energy car sector slowed to 15.5% compared to 24.6% in November, while production of industrial robots fell by 12.1% compared to a year earlier and the production of integrated circuits and high-end industrial and military products fell 2.1%, also compared to a year earlier, acc
The trade war is hitting China hard in high-tech
Here’s more bad news for the Chinese economy
What’s next for the Chinese economy? A bleak outlook, according to a slew of new data, as a trade war with the US wages on. Last month, it emerged that growth rate in the world’s second-largest economy had already fallen to its lowest in nearly 10 years. October figures suggest the country’s financial situation continued to worsen, pointing to a further slowdown. Specifically, the pace of new bank lending, which is a key source of funding for future growth, has fallen sharply.   First, a bit of background: the Chinese government had been asking banks to boost lending to the “real economy” (parts of the economy involved in creating actual goods and services, rather than financial speculation
Here’s more bad news for the Chinese economy
The US says China is hacking its way to better planes
China dreams of being able to make planes all by itself. The US says it’s trying to achieve that by stealing American technology. The US Department of Justice has accused a group of Chinese spies of attempting to steal aviation secrets from foreign companies, according to an indictment unsealed on Tuesday. The group of 10 Chinese intelligence officers had tried to hack into the computer systems of a US company and a French company, both manufacturers of turbofan engines used in commercial jetliners, the indictment alleged. They had also targeted US firms producing parts for the two engine makers, American prosecutors said. Advanced turbofan engines that propel large aircraft are notoriously
The US says China is hacking its way to better planes
China’s economy hasn’t grown this slowly since the financial crisis
Economic growth in China has fallen to its slowest in nearly ten years, as the country begins to feel the effects of a trade war with the US. Growth in the July to September months, the third quarter of 2018, fell to 6.5%, according to figures released by the National Statistics Bureau on Friday. That’s slower than the 6.7% posted in the April to June months. A median forecast of economists polled by both Bloomberg and Reuters predicted a slight drop in the economic growth rate to 6.6% in the July to September period. Friday’s reported growth rate was the lowest reading since the first three months of 2009 when China’s growth fell amid the global financial crisis. The latest figures show th
China’s economy hasn’t grown this slowly since the financial crisis