Andersen Xia

Andersen Xia

Video Producer

Andersen is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a video producer at the South China Morning Post with a focus on social minorities.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Video production
What it’s like to be a sea lion (and its caretaker) during the pandemic
Hong Kong’s Ocean Park was forced to close for a second time as the city struggles to fight its third wave of Covid-19 infections. Park employees that look after animals at the attraction say there has been little impact on the standard of care they get. But the intensifying global health crisis is keeping away guests that Ocean Park relies on, deepening its financial woes and leaving the animals’ long-term fate up in the air. 
Hongkongers defy ban to mark Tiananmen crackdown
Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban on the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. 
Thousands in Hong Kong camp out overnight for masks
Thousands of Hongkongers camped out overnight in line in the cold after a company in the Kowloon Bay neighborhood said it would release thousands of boxes of surgical masks for sale during citywide shortages caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Masks are believed to help prevent the spread of the virus, which has infected at least 24 people and caused one death in the city.  The company, Luck Well International Holdings, sold its entire stock of 11,000 boxes.
Hong Kong students form human chains to support protests
Thousands of Hong Kong school pupils and alumni formed human chains on the morning of September 9, 2019, as part of continuing protests to pressure the government to meet their demands. Though the government has announced it will withdraw the controversial extradition bill that initially sparked protests, demonstrations continue to insist on pushing four other demands, which include the establishment of a commission to independently investigate police conduct and greater democracy.
The art fueling Hong Kong’s protests
Amid anti-government protests that have rocked Hong Kong for nearly three months, some artists who support the movement talk about the works they have created to express their feelings about the movement or to offer support for demonstrators.
Gay Chinese go on a cruise, parents in tow
In mid-June, more than 1,000 members of China's LGBT community and their friends and families embarked on a five-day holiday cruise making a round trip from China’s southern city of Shenzhen to Vietnam. Organized under the slogan “Be Yourself,” the cruise was described as a trip “without closets.” On board, passengers were able to take part in workshops and sharing sessions meant to help gay and lesbian people better connect with parents who often struggle to accept their children’s sexual orientation. We had previously published a diary by a lesbian holidaymaker on the cruise. Now, we bring you a film featuring one of the gay tourists and his mother.
How China managed to save its national treasures
When imperial rule collapsed in China at the beginning of the 20th century, the emperor’s Forbidden City home was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum. Fierce fighting that rocked the country for years after the leadership change posed a grave threat to the palace treasures – considered one of the world’s greatest collections of art and artifacts. To protect them, the Palace Museum director decided to evacuate a large number of items and set them on a 14-year, 46,600-mile journey. Watch the video above.
The army of eunuchs behind China’s Forbidden City
The presence of eunuchs in the Chinese court was part of a long-standing tradition. These emasculated men frequently served as menial workers, spies and harem watchdogs in ancient Chinese imperial society. Over time, eunuchs serving in government roles began to exert enough influence with emperors that they could control state affairs or even orchestrate the fall of a dynasty. Check out our video, above, to find out more.
The high cost of honoring the dead
Grave-sweeping is an important part of the Ching Ming, or Qing Ming, festival – a 2,500-year-old tradition that sees millions flock to cemeteries to pay tribute to their dead. Family members and friends burn paper money, light joss sticks, and offer food and other trinkets to their departed loved ones. But these offerings don’t come cheap. And what’s worse, Hong Kong is running out of space for cemeteries, columbariums and cremation facilities. The dignity of death may be under threat.
Raising a child with autism in China
In China, children with autism are referred to as “children of the stars,” because communicating with them has been compared to talking to aliens. China has some an estimated two million people on the autism spectrum, but there’s very little support for them or their families. Wang Xuetao, 13, has never spoken clearly.  His mother Yang Yang, whose husband is intellectually disabled, struggles to raise her son by herself.