Annemarie Evans

Annemarie Evans

Annemarie Evans is a contributor to Inkstone and the South China Morning Post.

When Tigers roamed the concrete jungle of Hong Kong
Should you ever encounter a tiger in Hong Kong, run downhill. The big cat’s front legs are shorter than its hind limbs, its descent will be awkward and give you the edge as you escape. But since the last sightings of the South China tiger in Hong Kong were in the 1970s, that’s unlikely to be necessary. Villagers minding livestock or cutting grass on hillsides, however, would likely have grown up heeding that advice passed down from older generations. Author and graphic designer John Saeki learned about this from a friend whose mother is an elderly villager in Hong Kong’s northeastern New Territories. His friend’s mother had once seen a partially devoured calf, presumably the result of a tige
When Tigers roamed the concrete jungle of Hong Kong
Hong Kong artists celebrate distinctive rural village life
There’s a picturesque, historic village in northeastern Hong Kong that was once a flourishing community. More than 300 years old, Lai Chi Wo used to be one of the more affluent villages in the area. It was home to the Hakka ethnic group, who migrated from northern China to the south of the country hundreds of years ago. The Hakka – whose name means “guest families” – is a major group in the global Chinese diaspora. By the 1950s, however,  the village had become so poor that parents could not afford to send their children to school. So, like other indigenous villagers in rural Hong Kong, they migrated to work in restaurants in Britain and Germany, and later set up their own shops. Artist Eve
Hong Kong artists celebrate distinctive rural village life
Bridal laments tell old tales of arranged marriage
Her eyesight failing, Liu Kam-lan sits, hands clasped together, in San Uk Tsuen, a village in Hong Kong’s rural New Territories a few miles from the border with mainland China. Around her, other elderly women chat and laugh. She is asked to sing. In a lilting voice, she begins a “bridal lament” in the disappearing dialect of the Weitou people, who settled in the area during the Song dynasty (960-1279). The song is one of sadness, and tells a story dating back more than 60 years. Like other young women in her village, Liu was married off to a man she had never met. The Weitou women’s bridal laments are songs of anger for the matchmaker they felt betrayed them. “In the darkness, by the wooden
Bridal laments tell old tales of arranged marriage