Cannix Yau

Cannix Yau

Senior Writer, Hong Kong

Cannix is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Transport and infrastructure, government policies, investigative stories
Four in 10 American firms ‘could leave Hong Kong over national security law’
Nearly four in 10 members of an influential American business group are considering relocating from Hong Kong due to the city’s national security law, an indication of rising corporate fears over the sweeping new legislation, a recent poll revealed. Of the 154 firms surveyed by the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong (AmCham), 39% said they had plans to move capital, assets or operations out of the city after more details were revealed about the law, a rise from 35.5% of businesses polled in July. The remaining 61% said they had no plans to exit the city. On a personal level, 53% of respondents said they were considering leaving Hong Kong, while 46% said they had no plans to quit the c
Hong Kong's Covid-19 third wave ‘getting a bit out of hand’
Hong Kong is expected to tighten its social-distancing measures after a third wave of Covid-19 cases hit the city with health authorities warning the situation was "getting a bit out of hand." The city announced 52 new cases on Monday, in line with the recent escalation in cases, taking the total number of infections to 1,521, including seven deaths. Forty-one of the new cases were transmitted locally, and the source of 20 of these infections remained unknown. City officials met to discuss the new cases and were expected to further tighten social-distancing measures later in the day, having already reintroduced some restrictions last week. These included limiting restaurant customers to eig
70-year-old street sweeper killed in Hong Kong clash
A 70-year-old street sweeper hit by a brick during a clash between anti-government protesters and residents in Hong Kong on Wednesday has died. He was one of three people – including a 15-year-old boy – ­critically injured during confrontations over the past few days amid social unrest that created the worst political crisis in the former British colony since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. The 70-year-old, surnamed Luo, died on Thursday night after being struck in the head by a flying brick during a clash in the border town of Sheung Shui, a spokesman for Prince of Wales Hospital said. Protests have continued for months to demand accountability for alleged police abuse and call for de
‘Hongkongers, revenge’: Student’s death prompts outpouring of grief and anger
Thousands of people across Hong Kong took to the streets, shopping malls and campuses on Friday to mourn a student who died from a fall during a clash between the police and protesters. Mourners joined impromptu rallies in the hours following the death of Chow Tsz-lok, a college student who fell from a parking lot on Monday while riot police dispersed crowds with tear gas nearby.  Hundreds of office workers marched in the Central business district, many wearing masks in defiance of a government ban on face covering and vowing to seek justice. “Blood for blood,” some marchers shouted. “Hongkongers, revenge.” The development could escalate tension in a city that has been rocked since June by
These Hong Kong taxi drivers help anti-government protesters for free
They are the invisible Hong Kong taxi drivers who have carried anti-government protesters away from police in the midst of countless confrontations over the past three months of political turmoil. Some of these “protest drivers” said they started to help the protest movement because they could not be at the front lines themselves. Others said they felt sympathy with the protesters after watching too much violence on the nightly news. Others still said they put themselves in danger to be like the Korean taxi driver Kim Sa-bok, now lauded as a hero for his actions during the democratization of South Korea in the 1980s. Kim risked his life to drive a German journalist around a city in the south
Hong Kong subway blames rogue computers for morning chaos
Hong Kong’s subway system is a people-moving marvel. Every day it racks up 5.8 million rides, about half of all trips made daily on public transport in the city of 7 million people. It’s more profitable than any other subway system in the world, and literally 99.9% of its trains run on time. When cities build a modern train network, Hong Kong is often where they send people on a pilgrimage. (Not to take a dig at New York City, again, but in comparison New York’s subway trains are on time about 60% of the time.) But a six-hour service disruption on Tuesday has shaken the Hong Kong subway operator’s reputation and thrown all these superlatives into question. It was done by the computers Tony L
The curious case of the fake island and the wandering blocks
China has come under fire from the international community for building up artificial islands in disputed parts of the South China Sea. But it’s a Chinese-built island at home that has the city of Hong Kong in uproar. What’s the problem? A multibillion-dollar mega bridge linking Hong Kong to the neighboring cities of Macau and Zhuhai is sparking safety concerns. Aerial photos of the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge showed interlocking concrete blocks placed around the edges of an artificial island – which connects the bridge to a tunnel – appeared to have drifted away from the island. The Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge Authority, which manages the project, has dismissed as unfounded any worries