Cary Huang

Cary Huang

Columnist

Cary is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a veteran China affairs columnist and was previously Beijing bureau chief for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Foreign affairs, macro economy, Chinese politics
6 ways the coronavirus crisis will change China’s relations with the world
Viruses and epidemic diseases might originate in one country, but they have neither nationality nor loyalty. Instead of confining themselves permanently to one breeding ground, they travel far and wide, crossing one border after another. And globalization helps them travel further, and faster. This is why we have seen the novel coronavirus, which originated in the Chinese city of Wuhan and causes the disease now officially known as Covid-19, spreading wildly across the globe. This is also why we see the whole world sharing the price of the epidemic with China, whether it is in human casualties, economic losses or societal fallout, as a local health scare develops into a pandemic on a nationw
The US and China cannot afford to go their separate ways
In the past couple of decades, nothing has been as prominent in remaking the global economy and reshaping global geopolitics as China’s rise and globalization. China’s accession into the World Trade Organization in 2001 – the landmark inception of the world’s most populous nation into the global capitalist system – drove both China’s explosive growth and economic globalization. In the past year, however, a completely different theme has come to the foreground: decoupling.  Many in Washington fear or suggest that China and the United States, the world’s two largest economies, might go their separate ways, due to fundamental divergences in their philosophy on economics, governance and politics
US-China trade war: who’s more desperate for a deal?
Negotiation is all about give and take. The party more eager to get a deal done will give more. That is why Beijing made more concessions than Washington in the just-concluded first-phase deal after their marathon trade talks. Hopes were dim for any such deal in the weeks leading up to the 13th round of talks amid a number of controversies, including China’s quarrel over an NBA general manager’s support of Hong Kong protests and the passing of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act in the US House of Representatives. However, the political turbulence did not deter negotiators from striking a deal, as both nations want to end the tariff war that is badly hurting their economies. Politic
China’s show of military might risks backfiring
China’s military parade on October 1 – one of the largest in human history – to observe the 70th anniversary of the communist republic’s founding was largely aimed at a domestic audience. But the bigger impact of the massive display of Chinese military hardware was on the world stage, particularly on its neighbors and the US-led West, whether it was intended or not. Beijing proclaimed that the parade was showing a “peace-loving and responsible China.” Nevertheless, the widely asked question is what was the motivation behind such a massive show of Chinese military might – which included more than 160 aircraft and 580 active weapon systems, among them new fighter jets, bombers and tanks. The
China at 70 still isn’t a superpower
As China marks the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic on Tuesday, Beijing’s communist rulers have much to celebrate.  In the past few centuries, the country has never looked as strong as it does today, a consequence of the four-decade economic boom ushered in by the late leader Deng Xiaoping’s free market reforms and opening-up policy. In those 40 years, China has witnessed something of an economic miracle.  Nevertheless, China is still neither an advanced nor a developed country. Nor can it properly be described as a rich nation. It is a developing giant on the world stage. Just look at per capita income, arguably the best measure of a country’s personal wealth and it
Xi Jinping’s biggest headache isn’t Hong Kong. It’s the price of pork
Perhaps it’s no coincidence that we’re in the Year of the Pig. Rarely has a single food source played as big a role in the nation’s politics as now. Fears over a year-long outbreak of deadly African swine fever have steadily grown to the point that the topic now dominates the nation’s domestic and foreign agenda with talk of “pork politics,” “pork economics” and “pork diplomacy.” There’s good reason for the fuss. Pork is the principal source of dietary protein for the Chinese, who consume half the world’s supply. Since the virus was discovered at a farm not far from China’s border with Russia in August last year, it has spread to all 31 mainland provinces and up to 200 million pigs – nearl
Chinese leaders to take a seaside break (it’s not as fun as it sounds)
With the dog days of August upon Beijing, Chinese leaders are expected to gather in the coming days in a northern beach resort to escape the heat of the capital – and to talk. The resort, called Beidaihe, is located some 180 miles east of Beijing. It provides a relaxed environment for Communist Party leaders, retired and current, to exchange views that often become policy later. But while they might spend time on the beach, this year’s meeting will be watched particularly closely, with a host of unprecedented challenges facing the leadership. These include deteriorating Sino-US relations; the mass protests in Hong Kong, which leaders in Beijing may see as a challenge to its sovereignty; ris
What former Chinese premier Li Peng will be forever remembered for
Former Chinese premier Li Peng, who has died at 90, will be forever remembered for his controversial role in the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown. He memorably appeared on national television on May 20, 1989, angrily declaring martial law in Beijing. Li is remembered abroad as the “Tiananmen Butcher” for backing the crackdown on student-led protests. Li’s death was reported by China’s official news agency Xinhua on Tuesday evening. In the official obituary, he was described as “a loyal communist warrior” and “an outstanding leader of the Communist Party and the state.” The statement said he died of illness in Beijing on Monday. The obituary heaped lavish praise on the former premier, creditin
The Arctic is one of the world’s last unspoiled regions. Keep it that way
It’s ironic that faster-than-expected climate change has created a new economic opportunity in the Arctic just as environmentalists start talking up a “blue economy” based on the sustainable use of ocean resources. Thanks to global warming and the melting of the ice caps, a new ocean is steadily emerging and with it the prospects of new shipping lanes and access to hitherto untapped natural resources. But the geopolitical risks involved in exploiting these opportunities – to say nothing of the environmental consequences – may well outweigh the commercial benefits. They increase the risk that the Arctic could become a new arena of conflict in the deteriorating relationship between the United
US-Taiwan relations are at their strongest in decades. Thanks, Beijing
Diplomatically speaking, relations between the US and China are “official” and those between the US and Taiwan are “unofficial.” But this does not prevent Washington and Beijing from seeing each other as major adversaries and rivals while Washington and Taipei treat each other as trusted friends and allies. This is despite Washington switching its diplomatic recognition of China from Taipei to Beijing 40 years ago. The US-China relationship is now often deemed the world’s most important and complicated bilateral relationship, featuring both deep and wide engagement and intense competition. In comparison, since the enactment of the Taiwan Relations Act four decades ago, the US-Taiwan relation