Charley Lanyon

Charley Lanyon

Charley is a contributor to Inkstone. After years living and eating in Asia, he has recently relocated to Los Angeles where he is delighted to report that the dim sum isn’t terrible.

Language spoken
English
Trump hints at action on China over Hong Kong security law
President Donald Trump said his administration would “do something” within days about the situation in Hong Kong after the Chinese government decided to impose controversial national security legislation on the city. Critics said the proposed law threatened the civil liberties in the former British colony, which returned to Chinese rule in 1997 as a highly autonomous special administrative region. On Wednesday, Hong Kong was embroiled in city-wide protests as the local legislature debated a bill that would criminalize booing the Chinese national anthem.  When asked if he was prepared to use sanctions against China over the national security legislation, Trump said: “We’re doing something now
Sex may spread coronavirus: Chinese study finds traces in semen
Chinese researchers have found the coronavirus in the semen of a small number of men, raising the possibility that it could be spread via sex. The study at Shangqiu Municipal Hospital in central China’s Henan province included 38 men who had tested positive for Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, and found that 6 had the virus in their semen. These included 2 men who had recovered, “which is particularly noteworthy,” according to the study, reported in JAMA Network Open – an online open-access medical journal published by the American Medical Association. “If it could be proved that Sars-CoV-2 [the coronavirus’s scientific name] can be transmitted sexually … [this] might be a c
Two deaths upended how America understands the coronavirus
When Patricia Dowd, a 57-year-old auditor at a Silicon Valley chip maker, died on February 6, her death was a mystery.  She had developed flu-like symptoms but was already on the mend and working from home in San Jose, California. Her daughter found her dead in her kitchen. After flu tests came back negative, the coroner could only determine that she had probably suffered a heart attack – until Tuesday, when the Santa Clara County medical examiner announced that a postmortem tissue sample from Dowd came back positive for coronavirus. Postmortem tests of Dowd and one other Santa Clara resident – a 69-year-old man who died on February 17 – have shown both were infected with the novel coronavir
Chinese animation is having something of a renaissance
The world is in the throes of an animation boom. Audiences can’t seem to get enough of animated TV shows and films. In 2019, they raked in an astounding $250 billion. Today, three countries dominate animated film and television production and consumption: the US, Japan and – a distant third – South Korea. But a fourth player is making itself heard. China has developed an appetite for cartoons. According to the Global and China Animation Industry Report, the value of China’s animation industry grew from $12.8 billion in 2013 to $25.2 billion in 2018. It is expected to reach $50 billion by 2025. Until very recently, Chinese consumers and producers viewed cartoons as exclusively for children.
Simu Liu is ‘changing the world’ as Marvel's first Asian superhero
This hotel room in West Hollywood, dimly lit with the curtains drawn, shows no signs of film-star excess. No half-full bottles of flat champagne, no overflowing ashtrays. No powder-flecked mirrors on the countertops. No cracks in the plasma television.  Just some fresh clothes folded neatly over a chair and, on the table in front of us, a Nintendo Switch and a big bag of sour candies. And anyway, its occupant isn’t exactly a film star. At least not yet. Thirty-year-old Simu Liu clears off a spot on the couch and apologizes for the mess.  This room – what a TripAdvisor review might deem “perfectly adequate” – has been his home for the past few months. The only clues Liu has spent that time in
Lion dancing isn’t just a sport for boys
Growing up in Philadelphia, when Cassandra Liu wanted to join a lion dancing team in the city’s Chinatown, her mother said no. “She said it was too far and too dangerous,” Liu says. Her mother’s other big concern was that lion dancing was “a sport made for boys.” Today, the 26-year-old is living in Southern California. Not only is she a lion dancer, but she is also the captain of her troupe and is using her position to make sure that no aspiring lion dancer is ever discouraged like she was. She insists that no matter what your background or gender, you too can be a lion dancer – if you are willing to sweat. The proof of her vision is in her team: the Shaolin Entertainment Lion Dance Troupe,
Mongolia’s own Anthony Bourdain brings Mongolian food to the world
On March 7, a package arrived at Javkhlantugs Ragchaasuren’s office in Ulan Bator, Mongolia. Inside was a congratulatory plaque from YouTube: his channel, ArtGer, had surpassed the 100,000-subscriber mark. The milestone is a commendable achievement for any new media platform, but for a channel dedicated to sharing the rela­tively unknown culture of Mongolia, it was a triumph. Yet it was perhaps not a surprise considering ArtGer’s flagship program, Nargie’s Mongolian Cuisine, is one of the most engaging yet bizarre food shows on any medium – anywhere. In each episode, Nargie, whose full name is Naranbaatar Tsambakhorloo, travels to a region of Mongolia, meets someone who is known for being a
How America’s biggest Asian supermarket was born
US shoppers are spoiled for choice when it comes to grocery options. Massive supermarkets, discount outlets, mom and pop stores, high-end yuppie marts and ethnic markets of all stripes proliferate in even the smallest towns. But for many of the country’s 21 million Asian-Americans, grocery shopping has always meant one thing: a trip to 99 Ranch Market. The grocery store chain is the largest Asian supermarket chain in the US, ubiquitous in America’s largest Asian communities. Other markets may cater to the needs of niche Asian communities. But only 99 Ranch and its sole competitor – the Korean-American H Mart – serve the needs of the diverse breadth of the Asian-American community. But it was
Before Crazy Rich Asians, these YouTubers paved the way
Crazy Rich Asians was an undoubted sensation. The success of the romantic comedy blockbuster of the year has raised hopes for a new era of Asian representation in film and television, and that Asian-American cinema is on the cusp of a golden age. For the many Asian-Americans who have struggled for years to have their performances seen, and voices heard, by an entertainment industry that had routinely shown no interest in them, it is an especially exciting time. But for the co-founders of Wong Fu Productions, a digital production company based in Pasadena, that optimism is tempered by caution. “I think this moment is very significant, but we try not to get too caught up because we’ve heard th
Ai Weiwei takes over LA
Ai Weiwei, the famous Chinese dissident artist, has never had any major exhibition in Los Angeles despite living in the US between 1981 and 1993. Now, he can be seen everywhere at once. The 61-year-old artist has three exhibitions showing his works simultaneously in LA – at the United Talent Agency (UTA) Artist Space in Beverly Hills, Jeffrey Deitch gallery and the Marciano Art Foundation. Ai’s shows in California are his first after leaving China three years ago. After Chinese authorities returned his passport in 2015 he moved to Berlin, a city whose freedom and creativity he has praised. But there was bad news from home. In August, his famous studio in Beijing was demolished without warni