Chauncey Jung

Chauncey Jung

Chauncey is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a China internet specialist who has previously worked for various Chinese internet companies in Beijing.

Chinese crusader against ‘fake’ kung fu meets his worst enemy yet
In a boxing ring in northwestern China last month, controversial mixed martial arts fighter Xu Xiaodong found himself up against a kung fu master who professed the ability to paralyze an opponent with the jab of his finger. This mystical technique is sometimes called the “death touch.” But on May 18, touch was probably the last thing the kung fu master Lu Gang wanted. Xu landed punch after punch to his face. Forty seconds and one broken nose later, the fight was over. Over the past two years, 41-year-old Xu has made headlines for winning bouts against self-proclaimed masters of kung fu, or Chinese martial arts, in unusually high-profile matches. His challenge to old-school kung fu masters h
Chinese crusader against ‘fake’ kung fu meets his worst enemy yet
China’s toxic work culture is about money – and peer pressure
You go to work at 9am, and you leave at 9pm. Every day, six days a week. It’s known as “996,” a 72-hour work week that’s become the new normal in the Chinese tech industry. Many of the leading Chinese tech companies, including Alibaba (which owns Inkstone), JD.com, Bytedance and Huawei all have staff running on this schedule, according to a crowdsourced document naming and shaming some 40 tech companies on Github, a popular code-hosting site where two Chinese software developers have started an anti-996 campaign. The protest has a homepage cheekily named 996.ICU. It means that if you work 996 long enough, you will end up in an intensive care unit. But things are not supposed to be this way
China’s toxic work culture is about money – and peer pressure
What Communists do in China’s tech companies
If you were surprised that Chinese billionaire Jack Ma is a member of the Chinese Communist Party, the next fact will blow your mind: the party is a fixture in virtually all Chinese businesses. Many people reacted in shock to recent reports that the founder of Chinese tech juggernaut Alibaba (which owns Inkstone) is a member of the Communist Party. These people could not wrap their heads around Ma’s tremendous wealth and his association with a party that was founded to bring down capitalism and build a classless society. But people who understand how labels can outlive the reality raised a different, and arguably better, question: so what? It’s not a question of whether the party wields infl
What Communists do in China’s tech companies