Cheryl Heng

Cheryl Heng

Graduate trainee

Cheryl is a graduate trainee at the Post. She joined in 2020 after graduating from the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information at Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Prior to th

is, she was an intern on the features desk at Shanghai Daily.

Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Why Chinese people use ‘surrogate shoppers’ to buy stuff from abroad
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. A La Mer face cream costs $390 in retail stores in China but, according to a report from equity broker Bernstein, only $240 if one enlists the services of a professional shopper, or daigou.  For years these buyers have provided Chinese consumers with luxury goods at affordable prices, but they have been hit hard in recent months by the Covid-19 pandemic. What is a daigou? The term daigou means “buying on behalf of” in Chinese. It is used to describe professional shoppers who buy sought-after products overseas and resell them in China. Cosmetics, apparel
Why tattoos are still frowned upon in East Asia
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. Tattoos may be increasingly embraced by young people in China, particularly in cities like Shanghai, which has a burgeoning tattoo scene, yet age-old prejudices against those with inked skin prevail in many parts of Chinese society. Chinese state media have blurred David Beckham’s tattoos when he appeared shirtless on TV.  In Lanzhou, capital of the northwestern province of Gansu, authorities implemented a no-tattoo rule in August, ordering taxi drivers to remove their tattoos for good.  In countries like Japan and South Korea, attitudes toward tattoos ar