Chieu Luu

Chieu Luu

Executive Producer of Video

Chieu is a contributor to Inkstone and the supervising producer of video for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Video
These countries have reported zero cases of Covid-19
Much of the world has been hit by Covid-19 and many countries are still struggling for months to get their individual outbreaks under control. Even for the handful of nations that have yet to report a single coronavirus infection to the World Health Organization, the effects of the global pandemic are devastating.
Hongkongers defy ban to mark Tiananmen crackdown
Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban on the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. 
‘Two sessions’ explained: China’s most important political meetings of the year
China normally holds its most important annual political meetings in March, when the top political advisory body and national legislature gather. But in 2020, the meetings were postponed to May 22, 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. Although the “two sessions” take place only days apart on the political calendar, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) and the National People’s Congress (NPC) are two very distinct gatherings. Here’s a closer look at how the two sessions, known as lianghui in Chinese, shape the nation’s policies.
Hong Kong protesters defy anti-mask law
Thousands of protesters marched through the streets of Hong Kong over the weekend. Many wearing masks, they defied a new anti-mask law introduced by the city’s leader, who invoked emergency powers as demonstrations grew increasingly violent.
Tear gas, petrol bombs and mass arrests in Hong Kong
Downtown Hong Kong descended into chaos on Sunday as anti-government demonstrations entered their 17th straight week. Violent clashes took place two days before the People’s Republic of China marks 70 years since its founding. More protests are expected before and during the anniversary.
Police fire shot, water cannons in Hong Kong protests
For the first time in 12 weekends of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, a police officer fired a warning shot during clashes with demonstrators on Sunday. Earlier in the day, police also deployed water cannons for the first time, threatening to use them in order to disperse hundreds of protesters who had occupied a road following a march.
Blood, brains and more hotpot gems
The Chinese aren’t wasteful when it comes to food. There’s barely a part of an animal that won’t be eaten, somehow. In the colder months, many of the more unusual (well, unusual in the West) parts make their way to hotpot – thin slices of meat and vegetables cooked by diners at the table in a variety of simmering broths. Offal, including the stomach, intestines, blood and brains can all end up as hotpot ingredients. Some are prized for their texture, some for their taste… and some are said to be good to you. They may not look like the most appetizing thing on the menu, but ordering these items shows you’re a true nose-to-tail hotpot connoisseur.
How Macau’s famous custard egg tarts were invented
The Portuguese egg tart is a must-eat for visitors to the city of Macau, located on China’s southern coast. The sweet, soft tart consists of a baked egg custard inside a flaky case, caramelized on top. They’re close cousins of the Hong Kong-style egg tarts found in dim sum restaurants and Chinatowns across the world. But the name is misleading. The Portuguese egg tart is actually a 100% Macanese creation, invented by a Brit in Macau. Eileen Stow, sister to Andrew Stow, who invented the treat in 1979, tells us about its origins and how it grew to become one of Macau’s most popular snacks.
40 years ago, one man opened China to the world
Forty years ago, China was a poverty-stricken nation riven by conflict and left stagnant after decades of war. Today, it is the world’s second-biggest economy. China’s economy has developed more rapidly than any other country in history, and it’s mostly down to an idea from one man: the late paramount leader Deng Xiaoping, who introduced capitalist reforms into the communist economy in 1978. In the 40 years since Deng’s “reform and opening up policy,” China has completely transformed. But development has come at a price. Watch our video above to find out more.
Trump accuses China of meddling in US elections
President Donald Trump has accused China of trying to meddle in the November 2018 midterm elections. Speaking at the United Nations, Trump offered no immediate evidence to support his claim, saying only that “it will come out.” China was quick to hit back. Foreign Minister Wang Yi told the UN that Trump’s accusation was “unwarranted.” The comments came as the countries are embroiled in an increasingly bitter trade war that has cost each side billions of dollars in tariffs.