Chris Healy

Chris Healy

Field Camera Operator and Editor

Chris is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a field camera operator for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Indonesian
Areas of Expertise
Video Production, Editing, Producing
Hongkongers defy ban to mark Tiananmen crackdown
Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban on the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. 
Hundreds of thousands march in Hong Kong
Hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers took to the streets on December 8, 2019, the day before the six-month anniversary of the anti-government protests. For the first time since August, the Civil Human Rights Front, the organizer of the march, received a letter of no objection from the police.
Tradition amid transition: Yuen Long, Hong Kong
A shocking attack by suspected triad members in Hong Kong has focused attention on Yuen Long, a northern district where the violence took place. It is a bustling district in Hong Kong’s New Territories, where, less than a century ago, visitors found little more than a cluster of agricultural villages. In the 1980s, Yuen Long’s town center was built and a new residential town called Tin Shui Wai was established.  But people in the district still cling to their cultural heritage and traditional roots. Denise Tsang, a reporter with the South China Morning Post, visits the neighborhood.
Channeling Bruce Lee in ‘Warrior’
Hong Kong-born actor Jason Tobin plays the role of Young Jun, a Chinese gang leader in 1870s San Francisco, in the Cinemax hit show Warrior. Warrior is a television show based on an original idea from Hong Kong martial arts legend Bruce Lee. Watch the video, above, to see how Tobin embraces Lee’s philosophy in his life and career.
Hong Kong’s struggle against forgetting
Thirty years have passed since the Tiananmen Square crackdown, where hundreds of pro-democracy protesters were gunned down in the middle of Beijing by Chinese troops. Many people in Hong Kong still vividly recall joining a million-strong march in the city to support the student movement in Beijing. In the decades since the crackdown, pro-democracy advocates have called for justice for the demonstrators. Letting go of their memories is not an option. Watch the video above.
A New Year’s lion dance
The lion dance is an integral part of Chinese festival celebrations. Around Lunar New Year, you’ll see this spirited dance being performed across Chinese communities. The ‘lion’ consists of two performers sharing a single costume, working together as one. A brash, fierce dance performed to the beat of a drum and the crash of symbols, it’s intended to scare off evil spirits and entice in good luck. Watch our video, above, to see a lion dance in action and find out more about this tradition. 
Hong Kong’s playful past
Hong Kong was once the world’s biggest toy maker. From the 1950s to the 1980s, the city was a manufacturing hub, particularly specializing in plastics. Since China’s opening up to the outside world, much of the manufacturing business has moved to the mainland. Now the city’s toys offer a historical snapshot of the city in a simpler time, as toy enthusiast and collector Chong Hing-fai reveals. Check out our video, above, for a glimpse at a time when toys didn’t come on smartphones.
Blood, brains and more hotpot gems
The Chinese aren’t wasteful when it comes to food. There’s barely a part of an animal that won’t be eaten, somehow. In the colder months, many of the more unusual (well, unusual in the West) parts make their way to hotpot – thin slices of meat and vegetables cooked by diners at the table in a variety of simmering broths. Offal, including the stomach, intestines, blood and brains can all end up as hotpot ingredients. Some are prized for their texture, some for their taste… and some are said to be good to you. They may not look like the most appetizing thing on the menu, but ordering these items shows you’re a true nose-to-tail hotpot connoisseur.
Hong Kong’s top 5 Christmas displays
Most Chinese people don’t celebrate Christmas, but that doesn’t stop some cities from putting on Christmas displays. And Hong Kong’s malls in particular go over the top. The festive season is in full swing in the city, and we've rounded up the city's top five Christmas displays.
How Hong Kong money changed China
When ex-Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping announced the “reform and opening up” policy, it kicked off unprecedented economic growth that transformed China from a largely rural country to the world’s second-largest economy. The family of Hong Kong politician and industrialist Henry Tang was among the first to invest in mainland China, starting a textile business in the southern Chinese city of Shenzhen, which sits right on the border with Hong Kong. Watch the video, above, of how people like Tang helped change China.