Christopher DeWolf

Christopher DeWolf

Christopher is a contributor to Inkstone. He writes about urbanism, architecture and design – along with beer and other delicious beverages.

Hong Kong brewers match beer with Chinese food
Chef Jowett Yu’s pairing of grilled New Zealand fatty lamb ribs and an especially brewed beer has been years in the making. Years ago in China, the Hong Kong restaurateur had eaten lamb ribs at Guanguanji, a restaurant in Shanghai. The lamb had been slathered in cumin, fennel and chilli powder, and he had wanted to wash it all down with an ice-cold beer – which the restaurant did not serve. Now, however, Yu has finally been able to marry the two together. Dad Bod, a beer brewed in Hong Kong by Young Master Brewery, is sold exclusively at Ho Lee Fook, Yu’s modern Chinese restaurant in Soho – an upscale entertainment district in Hong Kong. Dad Bod is a pale ale made with guava that “cuts throu
China’s top-selling toothpaste has a history of blackface
When TV host Megyn Kelly defended blackface Halloween costumes on her new daytime NBC show, the backlash was swift and strong. She was fired within a week. For many, blackface is a reminder of how black people around the world have been oppressed and marginalized for centuries. You don’t need to look far to find examples. Walk into any supermarket in Hong Kong, Bangkok or Shanghai. Although it may not be obvious at first, one of Asia’s bestselling brands of toothpaste has deep roots in blackface. In a sea of products with slick packaging designed to evoke minty freshness, Darlie stands out on the shelves for its vaguely retro branding, marked by a black-and-white logo of a man wearing a top
How A-list celebrities are popularizing a grandma’s staple
For nearly a century, strong-smelling analgesic balm in a hexagonal jar has been a mainstay of medicine cabinets in Chinese families. Former Hong Kong resident Andrea Tam said her grandma always kept a tiny red tin in one of her undershirt pockets. “She literally used it for everything, any type of cuts and aches.” British-born journalist Vicky Wong had a similar experience. “No matter what the ailment – sore throat, cold, nosebleeds, mosquito bites – she would just put Tiger Balm on you.” But endorsements from fans including Lady Gaga and Gwyneth Paltrow have helped increase the profile of the ointment in the US. Lady Gaga described Tiger Balm as a backstage “must have” on Twitter. Paltro