Christy Leung

Christy Leung

Senior reporter, Hong Kong

Christy Leung is a senior reporter and writes about crime and security-related stories for the Post's Hong Kong desk. She began her career in 2010 and worked for Deutsche Welle in Berlin and for ATV b

efore joining the Post in 2015.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Crime, law and order, security-related issues
Hong Kong is getting a special police unit for its new national security law
Hong Kong police are setting up a dedicated unit to enforce the coming national security law, one that will be ready to function on the “very first day” the controversial legislation comes into effect, the city’s security minister told the South China Morning Post. John Lee, the minister, said the new unit, would be commanded by Hong Kong’s police commissioner Chris Tang. It would have intelligence-gathering, investigation and training capabilities, Lee said. But he declined to elaborate on how police would work with the new agency the mainland’s national security authorities are expected to set up in Hong Kong after the law is in place. The revelation came a week after the security minister
Hong Kong police say bombers planned to target officers at weekend rally
Detectives in Hong Kong investigating the seizure of two powerful home-made bombs at a school campus believe they were intended for an attack on police at a democracy march that happened at the weekend, sources said on Tuesday. The apparent bomb plot, revealed amid long-running anti-government unrest, prompted a police union to describe the city’s security situation as at its “most alarming” in decades, even worse than during a wave of armed robberies in the 1990s. Force insiders believed the would-be bombers were forced to abandon the attack planned for Sunday after a group of their associates were arrested in a police swoop that morning, hours before the march – which attracted hundreds of
70-year-old street sweeper killed in Hong Kong clash
A 70-year-old street sweeper hit by a brick during a clash between anti-government protesters and residents in Hong Kong on Wednesday has died. He was one of three people – including a 15-year-old boy – ­critically injured during confrontations over the past few days amid social unrest that created the worst political crisis in the former British colony since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. The 70-year-old, surnamed Luo, died on Thursday night after being struck in the head by a flying brick during a clash in the border town of Sheung Shui, a spokesman for Prince of Wales Hospital said. Protests have continued for months to demand accountability for alleged police abuse and call for de
Hong Kong tests water cannons for use in protests
Three controversial anti-riot vehicles armed with water cannons will hit the streets of Hong Kong this week and be ready to handle unrest by mid-August if they pass road tests, the South China Morning Post has learned. Operational guidelines have been finalized and the force was weighing whether to use the vehicles to spray dye on protesters to make identifying suspects easier, a senior police insider revealed. The possible use of water cannons comes at a time of rising tensions in the city as weekly demonstrations against a now-suspended extradition bill have escalated into clashes between protesters and police. But human rights groups and some legislators have raised concerns over the pote
Hong Kong activists call on Pompeo to help derail extradition law
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has met with Hong Kong’s leading pro-democracy activists, who are appealing for Washington to help stop Hong Kong’s controversial extradition bill. The city’s pro-Beijing lawmakers are pushing to enact a law that will allow residents and visitors to be extradited to territories that now lack formal extradition agreements with Hong Kong, including mainland China. Pro-democracy legislators in Hong Kong say the law would further erode freedoms in the former British colony, which has been operating under a separate legal system since its handover to China’s rule in 1997. A delegation of activists visited Washington this week to campaign for help from Pompeo and Con