Chua Kong Ho

Chua Kong Ho

Kong Ho oversees the coverage of technology news at the SCMP

Kong Ho is a contributor to Inkstone. He is the Technology Editor of the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Technology, business, content editing
How Taiwan became a global force in chip production
On a chilly day in February 1974, seven men gathered over breakfast at a soy milk stall in Taipei to map out Taiwan’s foray into semiconductor manufacturing. In an anecdote that is now legendary, Pan Wen-yuan, who was then a US-based research director at Radio Corporation of America (RCA), advised Sun Yun-suan, the minister for economic affairs, to develop integrated circuits. It would cost $10 million and four years for the technology to take root in Taiwan, Pan said. The plan was approved, and Taiwan managed to persuade RCA, then a dominant electronics company in the US, to agree in 1976 to transfer semiconductor technology. That April, a first batch of engineers were sent to RCA’s facilit
How Taiwan became a global force in chip production
How this female CEO is changing the game for China’s women
Jane Sun may be the head of a Nasdaq-listed Chinese tech company valued at $23 billion, but she’s not always treated like it. While attending a recent CEO conference in Silicon Valley, “people assumed I was there to accompany my husband,” said the 49-year-old head of Shanghai-based Ctrip, Asia’s biggest online travel platform. On a separate skiing trip to Canada, fellow skiers asked Sun’s husband what line of work he was in, but not her. “It’s not discrimination, but subconsciously you are someone’s wife,” Sun said in a recent interview with the South China Morning Post at Ctrip’s Zaha Hadid Architects-designed headquarters. Such experiences have only strengthened Sun’s resolve to introduce
How this female CEO is changing the game for China’s women
A Chinese tech bigwig wants to make gadgets that are cheap AND good
Picture something made in China. If what you saw was cheap but poorly made  – then this Chinese techie would like to prove you wrong. Lei Jun, CEO and co-founder of Xiaomi, best known as a smartphone maker, is convinced that he can build a consumer products empire that creates everything from pens to neck pillows: and everything will be both affordable and well-made. Talk is cheap, but investors are unlikely to dismiss Lei's goals as lofty. In fact, bankers are set to value his company at a whopping $100 billion when it goes public later this year, a person familiar with Xiaomi’s IPO plan told the South China Morning Post. By way of comparison, Facebook had a valuation of $104.2 billion when
A Chinese tech bigwig wants to make gadgets that are cheap AND good