Danny Mok

Danny Mok

Danny Mok is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Head of human rights group denied entry to Hong Kong
Hong Kong immigration authorities denied entry to the head of Human Rights Watch at the city’s international airport on Sunday, according to the group. Kenneth Roth, the group’s executive director, said in a report on its website that immigration officials told him he could not enter Hong Kong when he landed at the airport from New York, without explaining why. The American citizen planned to visit the city and launch the New York-based organization’s “World Report 2020,” with a lead essay on the Chinese government’s “assault” on the international human rights system. “I had hoped to spotlight Beijing’s deepening assault on international efforts to uphold human rights,” Roth said. “The refus
Head of human rights group denied entry to Hong Kong
McDonald’s outlet runs out of food as Hong Kong protests hit hard
Residents in one Hong Kong town have been hit hard by the anti-government protests sweeping the city this week – their local McDonald’s is running out of food. With radicals bringing major roads, tunnels and the subway system to a standstill this week, people have struggled to get in or out of parts of Hong Kong. It has left some neighborhoods, like the district of Tai Po, in semi-isolation. Restaurants and supermarkets have run low on supplies as well. Residents hoping to get breakfast at their local McDonald’s on Thursday discovered the only items on the menu were pancakes or macaroni. A staff member at one McDonald’s said they ran out of some buns, including Sausage McMuffins, and hash br
 McDonald’s outlet runs out of food as Hong Kong protests hit hard
Hong Kong’s first sex doll ‘brothel’ is no more
A venue billed as Hong Kong’s first sex doll “brothel” has closed up shop after two months in business. Police on Friday raided the business’s dimly lit site on the fifth floor of an industrial building in Hong Kong and arrested its operator. Patrons at This Mary, in the Kwun Tong district in Kowloon, paid $64 (or HK$500) to spend an hour with one of the three plastic sex dolls it provided.   Customers were required to wear a condom and the dolls were soaked in disinfectant for about 30 minutes after each session. The service was part of a marketing pitch aimed at encouraging customers to buy a human-sized silicone sex doll, which sells for between $2,300 and $3,800. But a police spokesman
Hong Kong’s first sex doll ‘brothel’ is no more
A jet lands in Hong Kong, too close for comfort
A Hong Kong-bound jet came within half a runway of smashing into another plane that still hadn’t cleared the airstrip at Hong Kong International Airport on Tuesday night, aviation officials have revealed. The city's Civil Aviation Department said no one was injured and reported the incident to Hong Kong’s Air Accident Investigation Authority.  The incident raised questions over whether controllers gave prompt orders to both planes, and why the department only disclosed what happened a day later. At 7:47pm on Tuesday night, a China Southern Airlines plane traveling from Zhejiang to Hong Kong landed on the north runway of Hong Kong International Airport, while a private jet which had just land
A jet lands in Hong Kong, too close for comfort
Personal data of 9.4 million Cathay Pacific customers hacked
Cathay Pacific Airways has discovered unauthorized access to the personal data of 9.4 million passengers managed by the airline and its subsidiary Hong Kong Dragon Airlines. Although the data leak was discovered in March, the airline only disclosed the breach in a statement late on Wednesday night. The compromised data included passengers’ names, nationalities, dates of birth, telephone numbers, emails, physical addresses, passport numbers, identity card numbers, frequent flier program membership numbers, customer service remarks and travel history. In addition, about 860,000 passport numbers and 245,000 Hong Kong identity card numbers were accessed without authorization. The airlines said 4
Personal data of 9.4 million Cathay Pacific customers hacked
Hong Kong cracks down on sugar daddies
It's a phenomenon that's becoming more visible because of the internet. In the West, it's called "sugaring." No, we're not talking about an alternative way of removing body hair. Sugaring is used to describe a kind of relationship in which a younger person gets financially compensated to spend time with an older person. The relationship usually involves sexual activity. Here in Asia, a similar set-up is called “compensated dating,” a term that originated in Japan but is now widely used in the Chinese-speaking world. Over the past decade, Hong Kong police have been stepping up efforts to combat compensated dating, which is regarded as a form of illegal sex work. During the latest crackdown o
Hong Kong cracks down on sugar daddies