Dayu Zhang

Dayu Zhang

Dayu is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a video producer for the South China Morning Post.

‘Tear gas’ flavor for Hong Kong frozen treat
The owner of a gelato shop in Hong Kong is making a political statement by offering “tear gas” flavored gelato to his customers. The city's police force frequently used tear gas to disperse crowds during anti-government protests that broke out in 2019. The shop owner wants to use the unusual frozen treat to educate people about the pro-democracy movement.
Protesters target Hong Kong malls for ‘Christmas shopping’
Hong Kong malls were the target of "Christmas shopping" protests on Sunday.  After more than 6 months of demonstrations, the city had seen a relatively calm period, but on this day riot police once again entered shopping malls after businesses were vandalized. Multiple arrests were made and there was a heavy police presence on the streets. Rallies from both sides of the divide took place near each other in the early afternoon. Thousands attended a pro-police rally and hundreds of social workers called for their colleagues to go on strike in support of the protest movement.
Hong Kong train derails during rush hour
A passenger train in Hong Kong has derailed for the first time, leading to a service suspension during rush hour on Tuesday. Services on the city’s railway system between Mong Kok East and Hung Hom stations in Kowloon were suspended after three carriages came off the tracks on Tuesday morning. At least eight passengers were injured. 
Hundreds protest student arrest with laser show
Hundreds have rallied at a tourist hotspot in Hong Kong to demand the release of a student arrested for carrying laser pointers. Keith Fong, president of Hong Kong Baptist University’s student union, was arrested Monday on suspicion of possessing “offensive weapons.” The university's faculty, students and alumni of the university held rallies to condemn the police for spreading “white terror” and demanded Fong’s release. Laser pointers have been commonly seen in anti-government protests in Hong Kong, apparently to confuse police officers or deter bystanders from taking photographs that could help to identify protesters.
Meet Singapore’s ghostbusters
Chew Hon Chin says he became an exorcist 16 years ago after receiving a vision in a dream.  Today Chew and his son Jeroen run Ghostbuster 99, arguably the best-known exorcism service in the city state. In addition to scaring off “spooks,” the father and son team claim to be able to help customers by enhancing their luck, casting away evil spirits or even “changing their fates.”
Matchmaking in Singapore
Little India is a district in Singapore popular with Indian immigrants. K. Sajeev Lal owns a photo booth there and helps his customers, largely migrant workers from India, look for brides. He takes portraits of his customers. Then they send the pictures to their families, who help them find brides in their hometowns. Over the years, Sajeev has helped hundreds of migrant workers find partners. Watch the video, above, to see why and how he does it.
A look inside China’s sports shoe capital
Over four decades, Jinjiang in China’s southeastern province of Fujian transformed into a sportswear-production powerhouse, specializing in shoes. Today, the companies based in China's "shoe capital" are aiming big, hoping to expand beyond the domestic market. The South China Morning Post traveled to Jinjiang to find out how local brands are becoming big names in China, poised to take on industry leaders like Nike and Adidas.
Former Chinese soldier remembers Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989
Chen Guang was one of the soldiers in the People's Liberation Army the Chinese authorities ordered into Tiananmen Square to clear out protesters on June 4, 1989. After he left the army, Chen became a painter and over the decades has been keeping memories of the bloody crackdown alive through his art. Watch the video above.
The Beijingers swimming through frozen lakes for their health
On a freezing lake in China’s capital, Beijingers are taking to the waters. “Winter swimming,” as enthusiasts call it, refers to taking a dip in sub-zero temperatures. Some believe it has great health benefits, while others say the shock to your system is risky. We meet some winter swimmers who try to convince us it’s a good idea.