Eduardo Baptista

Eduardo Baptista

Reporter, China

Eduardo Baptista is a Portuguese-Korean reporter who joined the Post in 2020. He was previously a freelancer based in Beijing and Hong Kong, writing for The Economist, CNN, and Foreign Policy, among o

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Decoding the censorship apparatus used by WeChat
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. Information is increasingly created, shared and consumed on a handful of social media platforms, a trend that has placed greater scrutiny on the owners and executives behind these tech behemoths, at least in the United States. As they have become more powerful globally, social media giants are trying to walk the tightrope by avoiding perceptions of censorship while corralling the spread of misinformation. In China, however, content censorship is part of the game and is widely accepted as a cost of doing business. WeChat, an app used ubiquitously throughou
The Philippines is now the online gambling capital of China
Inside a well-lit Manila studio, a young Filipino woman in heavy make-up and a low-cut black dress deals card for a game of baccarat, a popular game in casinos worldwide. But she stands alone – the players are thousands of miles away in mainland China. A camera directly opposite produces a video stream which is then marketed to the mainland, where gambling is illegal. Anyone who wants in on the bet must use a VPN to circumvent China’s Great Firewall, which the government uses to keep a tight leash on its domestic internet. After each hand, the dealer deftly swipes the card across a bar code to update the website and show the players if they have won or lost. More data is sent to a server ope
Navigating her heritage, woman finds racism in both America and China
After two years of living in Beijing, Jesse Bowens-Xu was tired, annoyed and ready to go home. The daughter of an African-American father and Chinese mother, she had gone to China to study and connect with her heritage. However, her skin color became a source of day-to-day frustration and prejudice. When applying for part-time teaching jobs to support her studies, the message she got was: “unmarketable to Chinese parents,” she said. This despite being a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and completing a master’s degree at the prestigious Peking University in Beijing. Locals running up to snap photos made her feel “like an animal in the zoo,” she said. About two years after