Eileen Guo

Eileen Guo

Eileen is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a freelance print journalist and audio producer. She was the founder of Impassion Afghanistan, the country’s first digital media agency.

A Chinese dissident’s widow is free. But can she speak freely?
When she was put under house arrest for no reason other than being married to a Nobel-winning Chinese dissident, the poet Liu Xia said her captivity was so ridiculous that “Kafka could not have written anything more absurd.” That was in 2012, when she was in captivity in Beijing and her husband, the Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, was still alive. But on Wednesday, Liu made her first major public appearance as a free woman in New York. She was allowed to leave China in July, a year after her husband died of liver cancer under the close watch of the Chinese authorities.      But even at the New York event, Liu appeared circumspect. Appearing in a talk titled “The Power of the Powerles
A Chinese dissident’s widow is free. But can she speak freely?
This endangered wood is more trafficked than ivory and rhino horn, combined
The purchasing power of China’s wealthy is the stuff of dreams for retailers – but it’s increasingly causing nightmares for conservationists. The tastes of China’s nouveau riche are driving demand for the largely illegal trade in rosewood: a fragrant, richly hued tree native to the tropics which is prized for its use in replica antique furniture. Chinese rosewood furniture has been meticulously carved by craftsmen since at least the 10th century. According to a collectors’ guide from Christie’s, rosewood furniture derives value from both its beautiful lustrous quality and its rarity, since it is difficult to harvest. The tree is slow-growing, with a lifespan of several hundred years. And th
This endangered wood is more trafficked than ivory and rhino horn, combined