Elizabeth Cheung

Elizabeth Cheung

Reporter, Hong Kong

Elizabeth is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Healthcare in Hong Kong, medical research, food safety
First human-to-dog coronavirus transmission reported in Hong Kong
A pet dog in Hong Kong may have caught the coronavirus from its infected owner. A Pomeranian belonging to a Covid-19 patient in the city has contracted the virus, the city’s health authorities confirmed on Wednesday. (What is Covid-19? Where did the coronavirus come from? Here’s what we’ve learned so far about the coronavirus.) The dog has repeatedly tested positive for having a low level of the virus since Friday last week. The infection is likely to be the first case of human-to-animal transmission of the disease, experts said, but animal lovers need not worry about their pets or their own health. “These test results suggest that the dog has a low level of infection, which was also found i
Coronavirus outbreak a step closer to full-blown epidemic, expert warns
The deadly new coronavirus outbreak that started in the central Chinese city of Wuhan has entered the stage of transmission among families and hospitals, taking it a step closer to a full-blown community epidemic, according to a top expert in Hong Kong. The warning came on Tuesday, as a study by the University of Hong Kong estimated that the virus had already spread to 20 other mainland cities from Wuhan in Hubei province between January 1 and 17, suggesting the situation was worse than officially reported. Professor Yuen Kwok-yung, a top infectious diseases expert at the university, said the transmission of the coronavirus had entered its “third wave.” “Now we can see infections of family m
First case of mystery viral infection confirmed outside China
Thai authorities confirmed on Monday the first case outside China of a patient infected with the new virus behind the Wuhan pneumonia outbreak. The woman, 61, is identified as a Chinese tourist from the city in central Hubei province.  She has been receiving treatment in a hospital in Nonthaburi near Bangkok since January 8, but is now recovering, according to Bloomberg and Thai media outlets. An expert said if further investigation found she had not been to Huanan Seafood Market, associated with the outbreak in Wuhan, it would suggest that the virus had spread to other parts of the city. The news came as Hong Kong health officials arrived in Wuhan on Monday to gain first-hand knowledge of t
China says it’s found what’s causing mystery pneumonia outbreak
China says it has identified a new strain of coronavirus from the same family that caused the 2002-03 Sars epidemic as the cause of a mystery pneumonia outbreak in the central city of Wuhan. At least 59 people have been infected since the outbreak was first reported last month, prompting worries about an epidemic like Sars, which killed hundreds of people in China. Laboratory tests have identified the new virus and the whole genome sequence has been obtained, state broadcaster CCTV reported on Thursday, citing a task force of medical experts. Fifteen patients in Wuhan had tested positive for the virus, which showed “typical coronavirus morphology,” the television report said. “The pathogen o
Virus behind Chinese city’s pneumonia outbreak yet to be identified
The World Health Organization said it is in ongoing contact with the Chinese government over an unidentified outbreak of viral pneumonia in the central city of Wuhan, amid concern it may have been transmitted from animals. Wuhan health authorities on Tuesday said 27 people – most of them stallholders at the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market – had been treated at a local hospital, with seven said to be in serious condition. Pathology tests were under way to try and identify the virus, officials said.  The outbreak has sparked worries in China and reminded many of the 2002-03 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) in China, which killed several hundred people and is thought to have
70-year-old street sweeper killed in Hong Kong clash
A 70-year-old street sweeper hit by a brick during a clash between anti-government protesters and residents in Hong Kong on Wednesday has died. He was one of three people – including a 15-year-old boy – ­critically injured during confrontations over the past few days amid social unrest that created the worst political crisis in the former British colony since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997. The 70-year-old, surnamed Luo, died on Thursday night after being struck in the head by a flying brick during a clash in the border town of Sheung Shui, a spokesman for Prince of Wales Hospital said. Protests have continued for months to demand accountability for alleged police abuse and call for de
Hong Kong police to probe sex assault claim against its officers
Hong Kong police said they would investigate a claim of sexual assault made by a female college student arrested during anti-government protests.  The woman, Sonia Ng, revealed the allegation and her identity on Thursday night during a town hall-style meeting with the president of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she is an undergraduate studying early childhood education. Ng, who was arrested in August, was the first protester to waive her anonymity in order to accuse the Hong Kong police of sexual misconduct. Her account has infuriated supporters of the ongoing movement.  In an emotional speech addressing the university’s president Rocky Tuan, Ng alleged that police had used foul
In a world first, a man catches rat hepatitis E
The world's first instance of rat hepatitis E virus infecting a human was discovered in a 56-year-old man in Hong Kong, the University of Hong Kong said on Thursday. The case emerged when the patient – who had undergone a liver transplant on May 14 last year at the university’s teaching hospital Queen Mary and was on immunosuppressant drugs – showed persistently abnormal liver function test results. This indicated problems with his liver graft. Immunosuppressant drugs are often administered to reduce the strength of the body’s immune system so that the body is less likely to reject a transplanted organ. Further tests showed the patient was carrying a species of hepatitis virus that until the
Hong Kong subways host antibiotic-resistant germs
Hong Kong’s MTR subway system is one of the cleanest, quietest, and most efficient in the world. But that doesn’t mean it’s spotless, a new study has found. Commuters on the city’s MTR trains bring in unique bacteria from the areas they live in, creating a cocktail of germs that passengers are exposed to throughout the network by the end of every day, according to the study led by the University of Hong Kong. About five million passengers – and the bacteria they bring on board – use the railway system’s 11 lines daily, researchers said in a paper in scientific journal Cell Reports. Samuel Kang Kang, first author of the study, told the South China Morning Post that the study was to “raise aw
You must be 18 to read this book
What do an adult magazine, a book of erotic photographs, and a novel by a superstar Japanese author have in common? They've all been classified as “indecent” in Hong Kong. Haruki Murakami’s latest novel, Killing Commendatore, was published in Japan in February 2017, with a Chinese-language version released in March. An English-language translation is due in November 2018. Earlier this month, a panel from Hong Kong’s Obscene Articles Tribunal classified the Chinese-language version of the book as “indecent.” Indecency is deemed to include “violence, depravity and repulsiveness.” The rating means that the work must not be distributed to anyone below 18, and must be sealed in a wrapper with pr