Enoch Yiu

Enoch Yiu

Chief Reporter, Business

Enoch Yiu is a contributor to Inkstone. She is chief business reporter at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Reporting financial regulation, banking, pension, insurance, asset management, personal profile
The world's largest IPO has been suspended
China’s regulators have foiled the largest stock sale in global finance as they called a halt on the November 5 debut of Ant Group’s IPO on the Shanghai and Hong Kong exchanges, less than 48 hours before the highly anticipated start of trading. Some 1.55 million small investors in Hong Kong had pumped $167.7 billion into the initial public offering in a bid to get a slice of the shares. They will get refunds, which include brokerage commission and stock exchange trading fee, within this week, according to Ant’s stock exchange filing. A meeting earlier this week between Ant Group’s senior executives and China’s top financial regulators led to “significant change” to Ant’s business environment
Chinese internet giant Alibaba gets greenlight to sell shares in Hong Kong
Chinese internet giant Alibaba has gained approval to raise as much as $15 billion dollars in a November share sale in Hong Kong, several sources told the South China Morning Post. Alibaba, which owns Inkstone, is already listed in New York. This secondary listing in Hong Kong would bolster the company’s capitalization and finally give investors in mainland China the chance to participate in the growth of one of the country’s most profitable technology giants. Investors in mainland China are expected to be able to trade Alibaba shares in Hong Kong through the Stock Connect program upon regulatory approval. The program allows investors to trade stocks listed on each other's markets through br
A monster hunting ban for this gaming giant
Chinese gamers looking to bag their next monster hide are out of luck. The world’s largest gaming company, Tencent Holdings, has pulled a hit video game from its platform less than a week after launch in the latest case of Beijing’s tightened controls over online content. The gaming giant — which owns, among others, League of Legends developer Riot Games — removed Monster Hunter: World from its WeGame platform after authorities received “numerous” complaints about the game’s content, WeGame said in a statement on Monday. That’s the latest in a long series of blows for Tencent, which today released tepid second-quarter earnings of 17.9 billion yuan ($2.6 billion), down 2% on the previous qua