Goldthread

Goldthread

Goldthread is a culture publication exploring trends and human interest stories in China. More stories on goldthread2.com.

Language spoken
English
The daunting task of repairing antique Chinese texts
Over the past decade, a millennial fascinated with rare books has painstakingly restored dozens of frayed, rotten and torn manuscripts – all by hand. Lian Chengchun, 32, is one of a dwindling number of people who make a living by fixing ancient Chinese books. China classifies antique books as those printed before 1912. According to one report, there are an estimated 50 million in China, and only about 20 million have been preserved, creating a daunting task for antique book fixers like Lian. “Some books have rotted, some are aged, some have water damage, and some cannot even be opened properly,” Lian says. “Some books are especially hard to fix, such as ones that are infested with bugs or h
How Hong Kong’s quintessential street snack has gained a cult following
In a nondescript storefront on a busy street in Hong Kong, a long line of hungry office workers begins to form each evening.  Yue Lai Lao Zhu Snacks is home to what many believe is the world’s best siu mai, a steamed dumpling made with pork, shrimp, mushrooms and, sometimes, fish paste. The hole-in-the-wall in Tuen Mun, a suburban neighborhood in the northwestern reaches of Hong Kong, has gained a cult following in recent years, especially among food-obsessed commuters who want a quick bite on their way home.  “Siu mai is part of Hong Kong people’s lives,” says Patrick Chu, who opened the thriving dumpling business a decade ago.  Chu’s dumplings - based on his father’s recipe- are regarded
Aw shucks! How oyster omelettes won a war
There might be something fishy about the story of how oyster omelets helped the Chinese win a war, but there’s no denying the eternal pull of the humble mollusk. A street food staple in Taiwan and the Chinese coastal city of Xiamen, legend has it that a Chinese general named Koxinga created the snack to save his troops from starvation. It was 1661 and China was defending Taiwan from the Dutch, whose battle tactics were to limit the Chinese army’s food supply by hiding rice. Desperate for food, Koxinga is said to have plucked oysters from the beach, coated them in potato starch and deep-fried them for his men. The army was saved from hunger and later won the war against the Dutch. While the