Holly Chik

Holly Chik

Holly Chik joined the Post as a reporter in 2019. Previously, she interned at Reuters in Hong Kong.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English
Social distancing in America worked, says study
Social distancing measures have flattened the curve of Covid-19 infections in the United States, but researchers have cautioned states not to relax the rules lightly. A study by data scientists and health experts from three universities in America and Britain found that controls on movement in the US significantly slowed the time taken for the number of coronavirus cases to double in all but three states.  The research, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, was published on preprint server Medrxiv.org on April 30. Schools and businesses in the US have been closed since mid-March, but states are under growing pressure to get their economies moving again after the unemployment rate rose to 14
Coronavirus may have been silently spreading as early as October, study says
The coronavirus that results in Covid-19 may have started its course toward a pandemic as early as October, according to a new study on the genetic make-up of the coronavirus. As debate on the origin of the virus continues, a growing body of research suggests the virus began spreading earlier than many thought. The pathogen, formally known as SARS-CoV-2, is thought to have made the jump from an animal host to humans some time between October 6 and December 11 last year, according to an article released on Tuesday and set to be published in the scientific journal Infection, Genetics and Evolution. The findings are based on analysis of more than 7,000 genome sequence assemblies collected from
Historical hat trick teaches kids about social distancing
An ancient Chinese hat has become the latest weapon in the fight against coronavirus after an elementary school in eastern China used them to teach its children about social distancing.  State news agency Xinhua reported that the school in Hangzhou got the children to make their own versions of the headgear worn by officials in the era of the Song dynasty, which ruled China between 960 and 1279.  The hats are distinctive because of the long wings that stick out from each side, forcing the wearers to have a 3ft bubble around themselves.  One legend says that the first Song emperor ordered his ministers to wear hats with two long wings on the sides so that they could not talk among themselves
British girl finds note from ‘Chinese prisoner’
A six-year-old British girl from south London in the UK found a Christmas card with a message allegedly from foreign prisoners in China. The sender of the message claimed that prisoners were being forced to work against their will in the Shanghai Qingpu prison. The holiday card, which is among those sold to raise money for charity, was bought from British supermarket chain Tesco. The retailer said it has halted production at a Chinese factory after the discovery and launched an investigation into Zheijiang Yunguang Printing, one of its suppliers located about 60 miles from the prison named in the message.
Wingsuit flying tournament in China
Australian flyer Scott Paterson has emerged the victor at a wingsuit tournament in Yunnan, China. He was among 15 flyers from 11 countries who joined the three-day event. Chinese state media reported that the prize money will be donated to poor local children.
China and India join forces to fight terrorism
Militaries from the two most populous nations on earth have been collaborating on anti-terror training. In December, China and India each sent 130 soldiers to take part in the 8th anti-terrorism joint exercise held in India.
Why Chinese mothers go abroad for sperm donors
In China, the marriage rate is falling and more affluent single women are seeking to become mothers without husbands. They are turning to overseas options. Unmarried women in China are largely barred from accessing sperm banks and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment, where an egg is fertilized by sperm outside the body. One single mother by choice tells her story.
Teenager breaks jump rope world record
Cen Xiaolin smashed his own jump rope world record in November 2019. He managed to jump over the rope 228 times in just half a minute. The 18-year-old pupil from a middle school in the southern province of Guangdong previously set a Guinness World Record in 2016 by skipping 208 times in 30 seconds.
China’s one-legged basketball player
Luo Xiangjian lost his right leg when he was five-years-old after he stepped on a bomb left over from the Sino-Vietnam war. But that did not stop him from chasing his dream of playing basketball.