Iris Deng

Iris Deng

Reporter, Technology

Iris is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a technology reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
China tech
This ‘cockroach robot’ could be the future of search and rescue
Anyone dealing with a cockroach infestation knows that the bug is virtually indestructible. It can also carry loads of up to 900 times its body weight, shrink to a quarter of its height to fit into small crevices and live for a week without its head. Inspired by the qualities of this insect, a group of researchers from China and the US have created a prototype of a fast-moving and nearly-indestructible mini robot, which could potentially replace sniffer dogs in detecting people trapped in rubble after natural disasters. Researchers from China’s Tsinghua University and the University of California, Berkeley, published their study on so-called soft robots in the academic journal Science Robot
This ‘cockroach robot’ could be the future of search and rescue
Business book ‘The American Trap’ is selling like hot cakes in China
As photos of Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei showing journalists around his office began to circulate this week, a book on his desk caught the eye of the public – The American Trap. It was a Chinese translation of Le Piège Américain, written by Frenchman Frederic Pierucci, a former executive with French rail transport company Alstom, about his five-year tussle with the US Department of Justice. It was co-authored by journalist Matthieu Aron. The American Trap, first released in France in January, was published in China in April, just as China and the US struggled to reach an agreement to end their trade war. Its Chinese tagline reads: “how to dismantle other countries’ business giants through no
Business book ‘The American Trap’ is selling like hot cakes in China
Chinese tourists are shunning the US for Europe
Chinese tourists are shunning the United States amid the trade war and opting for destinations in Europe, said Jane Sun, chief executive of Ctrip, Asia’s largest online travel platform. The US slid to 10th spot in the list of China’s top overseas destinations in a week-long national holiday in October known as the “golden week” from fifth in the previous year, according to Ctrip. During the recent Labor Day holiday earlier this month, the US ranked as the ninth-most popular travel destination for Chinese tourists, down from fifth spot last year. Thailand and Japan remained the top choices. “People like to travel to countries that welcome them,” Sun said. “When Chinese consumers have the bu
Chinese tourists are shunning the US for Europe
China’s Tinder pulled from app stores
Tantan, a popular Tinder-like dating app in China, has been removed from several app stores in the country amid a government crackdown on content that it considers inappropriate. Since its founding in 2014, Tantan has grown into one of the country’s top dating apps with more than 100 million monthly users, according to figures released by the company. The suspension of Tantan comes as Beijing has tightened its control over the Chinese internet under President Xi Jinping. Chinese censors have in recent months ramped up a campaign to remove content it calls “negative information,” including pornography, gambling, fake news and political dissent. In mid-April, China’s internet watchdog shut dow
China’s Tinder pulled from app stores
Facebook is changing, and this Chinese app is the model
What does Mark Zuckerberg want for the future of Facebook? Just look at China’s super-app – WeChat. Even as his social media empire announced a new emphasis on privacy, the founder of Facebook said that he regrets not taking note of WeChat sooner. Not because of its approach to privacy, but because its direct messaging model has made WeChat the ubiquitous app for everyday life in China. “If only I’d listened to your advice four years ago,” Zuckerberg wrote on Facebook on Friday in response to tech journalist Jessica Lessin, who was highlighting a March 2015 article in which she suggested Facebook should learn from WeChat. Amid slowing user numbers growth and an ongoing privacy crisis, Zucke
Facebook is changing, and this Chinese app is the model
Who is Kris Wu and why are Ariana Grande fans so pissed at him?
Kris Wu? Who? That was the question on the minds of many a pop music fan, as he shot to the top of the iTunes charts over the weekend – pushing Ariana Grande off the list completely. Beast Mode all the way up #antares #1 pic.twitter.com/BrHtCtSJ62 — Kris Wu (@KrisWu) November 2, 2018 The Canadian-Chinese singer, who is huge in Asia but lesser-known in the west, has been accused of using bots to boost the performance of his new album – knocking American pop stars including Grande and Lady Gaga off the top spots. Now iTunes appears to have removed his music from the charts entirely. Kris Wu’s album and songs have been removed from the US iTunes Charts after accusations of boosted sales have su
Who is Kris Wu and why are Ariana Grande fans so pissed at him?
China has 802 million internet users. That’s 802 MILLION
China now has as many internet users as the populations of the United States, Indonesia and Brazil combined. 802 million people in China use the internet as of June 2018. That’s according to a report by the state-run China Internet Network Information Center, released on Monday. 802 million Number of internet users in China. The figure is equivalent to 58% of the population – which is low when compared to about 89% of Americans who are online. 98.3% of China’s internet users get online on mobile devices. The state report says that all but 1.7% of China’s internet users access the internet through mobile devices. And as of June this year, about 566 million people use mobile payment – that's
China has 802 million internet users. That’s 802 MILLION
The story of China’s everything app
WeChat isn’t just the Chinese version of WhatsApp. It’s so much more: an app that allows you to do everything from play games, to read the news, pay for meals… even make an appointment to file for divorce. With more than one billion monthly active user accounts, it’s not an overstatement to say that WeChat is an indispensable part of everyday life in China. But in the last few months investors have been questioning whether Tencent, the behemoth owner of the ubiquitous app, has lost its mojo – worries borne out by the company's recent lackluster earnings, announced yesterday. Here’s how WeChat went from simple messenger to China’s most popular mobile app. Humble start WeChat, or Weixin as it’
The story of China’s everything app
ZTE gets a boost, but China’s chip industry needs a bigger one
Embattled Chinese telecoms giant ZTE has just had a shot in the arm. Taiwanese chip company MediaTek has reportedly received permission to resume sales to the equipment and smartphone maker. This comes after the US government banned American companies in April from selling parts to the Chinese telecom equipment and smartphone maker for a period of seven years.  Taiwan’s Ministry of Economic Affairs on Friday granted an export permit to MediaTek, which supplies chipsets for ZTE smartphones, while several other Taiwanese companies are waiting for similar approvals, The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday. Taiwanese companies, though not directly covered by the US ban, were required to obta
ZTE gets a boost, but China’s chip industry needs a bigger one