Jane Cai

Jane Cai

Jane is a contributor to Inkstone. She is the Beijing Bureau Chief of the South China Morning Post.

‘Comrade Trump’ hailed for spurring reforms in China
US President Donald Trump may have his critics in China, but some internet users have suggested, albeit sarcastically, that he has been a positive force for the country.  They joke that he is acting as a catalyst for much-needed reforms. In social media circles and even on some academic forums, the American leader earned the nickname Comrade “Chuan Jianguo,” which translates as “Trump Building the Nation.”  The backhanded compliment stems from the assumption that, by starting a trade war with China, Trump unwittingly forced the country into a program of domestic reforms to counter its impact. Such is people’s familiarity with the nickname that Wang Manchuan, head of the public administration
‘Comrade Trump’ hailed for spurring reforms in China
The trade war has China’s liberals pushing for change
The trade war between China and the US has spelled economic pain for everyone and everything from car-makers to aircraft carriers… and perhaps even regular American Christmas shoppers. But Chinese liberals are using the impact of the trade war to press Beijing to reform and further open up the economy, the South China Morning Post has learned. About a dozen intellectuals in government-backed think tanks have been calling for key reforms through lobbying policymakers – chief among them Liu He, the country’s vice-premier and chief trade negotiator. Many of the reforms sought correspond to America’s own demands in the trade war – such as ending subsidies and preferential treatment, reducing th
The trade war has China’s liberals pushing for change
Solo gyms and karaoke for one: welcome to the loneliness economy
Mini karaoke booths, one-person gyms and games that offer virtual friendship: welcome to China’s loneliness economy. The country has an estimated 200 million single people, and firms have cottoned on to the fact that singles are increasingly affluent and want to spend their cash. Take the case of twenty-something Beijinger Jodie Zuo, who paid $4 to sing for 15 minutes in a corner of a supermarket in Beijing on a Sunday afternoon. “I just planned to buy some snacks,” she said. “Tempted by the mini karaoke, I sang eight songs and it made me feel less bored.” Tucked away in shopping malls, cinemas, airports and even subway stations, there are now at least 20,000 mini karaoke booths operating a
Solo gyms and karaoke for one: welcome to the loneliness economy