Jevans Nyabiage

Jevans Nyabiage

Kenyan journalist Jevans Nyabiage is South China Morning Post's first Africa correspondent. Based in Nairobi, Jevans keeps an eye on China-Africa relations and also Chinese investments, ranging from i

nfrastructure to energy and metal, on the continent.

Language spoken
English
China’s demand for donkey skins is hitting African communities hard
Slaughterhouses in Kenya for donkeys have turned the country into a hotspot for the global trade in their skins, which are highly valued in Chinese medicine. But animal rights campaigners have warned that this trend could have a “devastating impact” on poor communities. Some donkey skins are smuggled from neighboring countries such as Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania and South Sudan to supply the factories in Kenya, which is the only country in East Africa with licensed donkey abattoirs. According to the activists, more than 1,000 donkeys are being slaughtered each day to supply China with donkey hide, which is made into gelatin called ejiao, a traditional remedy believed to improve blood circulat
China’s demand for donkey skins is hitting African communities hard
Africa wants to sell more to China. Enter avocados
Africa’s trade imbalance with China is a major issue. But unlike the US, African countries aren’t looking to declare a trade war. From Ethiopia to Namibia, they are trying to move up the export value chain, in a shift that will involve working out what Chinese consumers want and how to get it to them. For example, Kenya is the continent’s biggest exporter of avocados, which are in high demand in China. China imported nearly 40,000 tons of avocados last year, rising from just 35 tons in 2011. This growth is what Kenyan producers are hoping to tap into.  It has signed an agreement on food, plant and animal safety that will let it export various farm products, including avocados, to China. “Ch
Africa wants to sell more to China. Enter avocados
Is China putting Africa on the debt-trap express?
When Clement Mouamba, prime minister of the Republic of Congo, went to Beijing last year, he had an important task: to find out exactly how much his country owed China.  The struggling, oil-rich central African nation had, until then, not been able to provide a number to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to qualify for a bailout.  The IMF had postponed talks on further loans until Mouamba’s administration could say how much it had to repay to its external creditors, including China – the republic’s single largest bilateral lender – and oil multinationals such as Glencore and Trafigura. The country, which heavily depends on oil revenue, turned to China and oil majors for funding to run th
Is China putting Africa on the debt-trap express?
Is Kenya’s popular Chinese-built railway a massive white elephant?
At first blush, a new Chinese-built railway connecting Kenya’s capital to its picturesque coast is an unqualified success. Built at a cost of $3.2 billion, the Standard Gauge Railway, or SGR, runs twice daily between Nairobi and Mombasa, a famed port city. The railway has carried 3 million passengers since its launch in mid-2017.  Travelers make the 293-mile journey in just 4.5 hours and in remarkable comfort. Previously, the same trip could take anywhere from 12 to 24 hours, depending on the mode of transport. Elephants, lions, buffalos and rhinos can often be seen along the journey. However, carrying passengers is not the main reason why the new railway line was built.  In 2014, when Keny
Is Kenya’s popular Chinese-built railway a massive white elephant?