Jing Zhang

Jing Zhang

Jing is a contributor to Inkstone. She is Senior Culture & Fashion Correspondent at the South China Morning Post.

From China’s first Coke, to tanks in Tiananmen, to Dior in Shanghai
Photojournalist Liu Heung Shing moved home to China after the death in 1976 of Mao Zedong. He sensed a shift on the horizon. Over a 40 year career as a news photographer for media organizations including Time, Life and the Associated Press, he captured the fall of the Soviet Union – for which he won a Pulitzer Prize – and China’s own tumultuous opening up to the outside world, from economic development to the bloody Tiananmen Square crackdown. Liu is set to release A Life in a Sea of Red, a book of his award-winning work from China and Russia, in Hong Kong during the Art Basel fair this month. Check out our gallery, above, for a glimpse of his spectacular work. See Liu’s work through April 1
Jackie Chan on showcasing Chinese culture – and John Cena’s Mandarin
With a body of work that spans more than 40 years, Chan has achieved fame, fortune, and many broken bones – but the international action star views his career as having a deeper purpose. “When I film now, it’s not about what’s just fun or amusing,” says Jackie Chan. “I think about if the film can bring Chinese culture, or my own culture and reflections, to the outside world… It’s as simple as that.” In recent years, Chan has become more vocal about national pride and the role he can play as a cultural ambassador. “It’s something that I feel I have a duty to do,” he says. “For example, projects like Kung Fu Panda; even if the budget is super low, I’ll still do it. Why? I want these films to b