Jonathan White

Jonathan White

Senior Production Editor, Sport

Jonathan White joined the Post in 2017 after a decade reporting on sport from China. He originally moved to Beijing to coach football in 2007 and later spent two years in Shanghai.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English
Areas of Expertise
China sport, content creation
‘Striking’ lack of regret led to Chinese star swimmer Sun Yang’s doping ban
Chinese superstar swimmer Sun Yang paid for the “huge risk” he took in the controversial doping test that led to him being banned for eight years by the Court of Arbitration for Sport. The court on Wednesday published its full report into the case brought by the World Anti-Doping Agency against Sun Yang and swimming governing body Fina, with the 78-page document making for damning reading. The report is highly critical of Sun and his team for their actions from the out-of-competition test at his home in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou in September 2018 through to the end of the CAS hearing last November. On the night of testing, Sun gave a blood sample before taking issue with the cred
The spectacular fall of Chinese swimmer who called himself ‘king’
“I am the king,” Sun Yang said at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. He was referring to his position in the 1,500m freestyle and his rivalry with Australian swimmer Mack Horton, but he could have been talking in general. Much like the other “Sun King,” Louis XIV of France, China’s superstar swimmer has surrounded himself with a court of flatterers and sycophants. That is why Sun, 28, only talks to state-run media Xinhua and CCTV, plus two or three Chinese print journalists, as he knows the coverage will be positive. Heaven forbid there was any negativity, or worse: people preferred rival Ning Zetao, as some fans and media did. This and the literal embrace of swimming’s governing body – Sun was hug
European soccer is winning Chinese social media despite controversies
Barcelona, Cristiano Ronaldo and the English Premier League were the big winners in a soccer popularity survey of the Chinese digital market. According to the annual Red Card Report, Chelsea became the Premier League’s most successful team in China, leapfrogging champions Manchester City and former favorites Manchester United. There was good news for United, as they remain the most-followed international team on Weibo, China's version of Twitter. Their former player, Cristiano Ronaldo, is the most-followed foreign footballer on the platform and also bucked the trend of decreased engagement and followers for players on Weibo. Now in its ninth year, the Red Card Report is published by digital
No deal and no name as German soccer counts the cost of China backlash
A German soccer club and one of the country’s star players are feeling the heat from China.  News emerged over the weekend that Bundesliga side Cologne lost a deal with a Chinese gambling sponsor. Meanwhile, state-controlled Chinese media are still blacklisting Arsenal star and former German international player Mesut Özil. According to Cologne newspaper Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger, the loss for the postponed deal was about $1.66 million.  The club did not offer comment but confirmed that the sponsors from China had withdrawn the potential deal, reported Deutsche Welle online. Cologne made headlines last month when they chose to postpone a joint academy with the Chinese soccer club Liaoning.  The
The man who brought the NBA to China
David Stern liked to tell the story of travelling China in 1990 when a local guide in Xian revealed her favorite team. “You know, I am a great fan of the team of the red oxen,” she told Stern and his wife, Dianne.  Cue confusion then smiles on realizing it was the Chinese translation for the Chicago Bulls. Nowadays, the whole of China knows the Zhijiage Gongniu, as they are known in Mandarin, and Stern is as more to credit for that than anyone – even their star player. “Without David Stern, the NBA would not be what it is today,” Michael Jordan, the six-time NBA champion with the Chicago Bulls and talisman of that 1990 team, said after Stern’s death at the age of 77 on New Year’s Day. “He gu
Career of Chinese swimming superstar hangs in the balance
Sun Yang is the shining star of Chinese swimming, but the Olympic champion’s future hangs in the balance ahead of next summer’s Tokyo Olympic Games. The 27-year-old faces a doping hearing at the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Switzerland starting on November 15. At the swimmer’s insistence, it will be a public hearing, with the court expected to live-stream it online. So how did we get here? It all stems back to an incident at Sun’s home on September 4, 2018 during an out-of-competition drug test. This was reported by Britain’s The Sunday Times newspaper in January 2019. Sun questioned the credentials of a member of the doping control team who had showed up at his home to test him. Sun co
Money or moral high ground? NBA’s Adam Silver has to pick a side
Let the games begin. Now that NBA commissioner Adam Silver is on his way to Shanghai from Tokyo, the ongoing furor stemming from Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey’s tweet backing Hong Kong’s anti-government protesters is going to go into overdrive. While the tweet was subsequently deleted and Morey backtracked, that has not proved enough for China. The NBA initially released a statement on Monday outlining their position. The trouble was that the Chinese statement, posted on the league’s official Weibo account, did not match the language of the English. By the time the NBA released another statement on Tuesday – ahead of Silver’s press conference in Tokyo – stating that the English was the one
Jeremy Lin says he’s open to moving to China
Jeremy Lin, currently an unrestricted free agent, says he’s considering playing in the Chinese Basketball Association. “Of course I am thinking about the CBA,” Lin told reporters in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou on Friday. “I don’t know where I will be next year, so I don’t have expectations. I know what level I can play at, so if I don’t get that I won’t settle.” Lin, who left the Toronto Raptors this summer after winning the NBA championship with them, was speaking at a press conference to launch his role as a brand ambassador for Chinese sportswear brand Xtep.  He will be the pitchman fronting four models of basketball shoes featuring “Linsanity” stitching, which will be available in
‘The NBA has kind of given up on me’: Jeremy Lin breaks down in interview
Jeremy Lin has revealed he is finding his current period of free agency difficult in an interview in Taiwan. The NBA champion and committed Christian appeared on Taiwan’s Christian television channel Good TV’s The Waiting Game and he did not hold back on his feelings. “Free agency came around and this was the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Lin said in English. “Good luck translating it,” he said to the Mandarin translator. Lin has been an unrestricted free agent since leaving the Toronto Raptors after winning the NBA championship with them in early June. Since his breakout in 2012 in a phenomenon called “Linsanity,” Lin has repeatedly suffered from injuries. Despite being regarded as on
China’s Magic Johnson, the ‘worst-ever NBA champ’
Jeremy Lin is the first Asian-American winner of the NBA. But he’s not the first player of Chinese heritage to do so. Sun Yue wasn’t the first either. That honor belongs to Mengke Bateer of the San Antonio Spurs, who rode the bench all the way to his ring in 2003. But this is the winding, bizarre story of how Sun, the “Chinese Magic Johnson,” won a ring in 2009 with Kobe Bryant’s Los Angeles Lakers without playing a minute. His tale starts in 2007, when Sun entered the draft – something that almost didn’t happen, according to his former agent Keith Glass. His club, Beijing Aoshen, insisted that the 6 foot 9 inch point guard had to be picked in the first round, or not at all. In his book Sev