Karif Wat

Karif Wat

Motion graphic designer, Video

Karif is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a motion graphic designer for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Motion graphic design, branding design, content editing
‘Two sessions’ explained: China’s most important political meetings of the year
China normally holds its most important annual political meetings in March, when the top political advisory body and national legislature gather. But in 2020, the meetings were postponed to May 22, 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. Although the “two sessions” take place only days apart on the political calendar, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) and the National People’s Congress (NPC) are two very distinct gatherings. Here’s a closer look at how the two sessions, known as lianghui in Chinese, shape the nation’s policies.
How Covid-19 has disrupted air travel
Airline tracking site Flight Radar 24 documented a massive reduction in the number of aircraft flying around the world as the new coronavirus spread after it was first reported in central China. The International Air Transport Association predicts that air traffic in 2020 may fall by at least 38%.
As deaths mount, is the US ready for the coronavirus?
As coronavirus cases surge worldwide, US President Donald Trump said his administration has done an “incredible job” preventing the spread of Covid-19 in the country. A US health official from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has meanwhile warned it is not a question of “if” but rather “when” America will face a community spread of the virus. California has been monitoring 8,400 people for signs of infection after it reported a coronavirus case of unknown origin, potentially the first instance of community transmission in the US. Washington state has reported 2 deaths from the coronavirus, and New York has reported its first case. The US has 88 reported cases as of March 2.
Getting home for Lunar New Year
It is the 2020 Lunar New Year holiday, and 11-year-old Xiaoxiao and her little brother are at home with their grandparents in a remote part of central China. They are anxiously waiting for the Spring Festival reunion dinner when their parents return from their jobs in southern Guangdong province. Like hundreds of millions of rural migrant workers in China, Chen and Liu travel home only once a year. The travel rush over the holiday period, which lasts up to 40 days, is considered the largest annual human migration in the world.
Is Bruce Lee the father of mixed martial arts?
Bruce Lee wasn't just an actor and kungfu master, he founded his own hybrid philosophy of martial arts called Jeet Kune Do. Tragically, Lee died in Hong Kong at the age of 32 from cerebral edema on July 20, 1973, the same year his film Enter the Dragon was released posthumously.  The action film would go on to become a smash box-office hit that sparked worldwide interest in martial arts.  Following Lee’s death, combat sports grew in popularity around the world. While most people credit the US with inventing mixed martial arts, a growing number of Lee's fans are supporting the claim that Bruce Lee is the true creator of MMA.
Tradition amid transition: Yuen Long, Hong Kong
A shocking attack by suspected triad members in Hong Kong has focused attention on Yuen Long, a northern district where the violence took place. It is a bustling district in Hong Kong’s New Territories, where, less than a century ago, visitors found little more than a cluster of agricultural villages. In the 1980s, Yuen Long’s town center was built and a new residential town called Tin Shui Wai was established.  But people in the district still cling to their cultural heritage and traditional roots. Denise Tsang, a reporter with the South China Morning Post, visits the neighborhood.
How China managed to save its national treasures
When imperial rule collapsed in China at the beginning of the 20th century, the emperor’s Forbidden City home was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum. Fierce fighting that rocked the country for years after the leadership change posed a grave threat to the palace treasures – considered one of the world’s greatest collections of art and artifacts. To protect them, the Palace Museum director decided to evacuate a large number of items and set them on a 14-year, 46,600-mile journey. Watch the video above.
The army of eunuchs behind China’s Forbidden City
The presence of eunuchs in the Chinese court was part of a long-standing tradition. These emasculated men frequently served as menial workers, spies and harem watchdogs in ancient Chinese imperial society. Over time, eunuchs serving in government roles began to exert enough influence with emperors that they could control state affairs or even orchestrate the fall of a dynasty. Check out our video, above, to find out more.
Inside the Forbidden City: The Emperor’s harem
All women living in imperial China’s Forbidden City were carefully sequestered in quarters deep inside the palace. Most were employed as maids and servants, but there was also a select group of concubines tasked with bearing children for the emperor – as many as he could father. The selection process was extensive… and the life of a concubine was often a harsh, lonely one. Check out our video, above, to find out more.
How it was built: The Forbidden City
Beijing's former imperial palace, the Forbidden City, was the royal residence and seat of the Chinese government for five centuries. The massive complex contains more than 8,700 rooms, inside buildings constructed without a single nail or drop of glue. We look at the durable construction techniques that have allowed the Forbidden City to withstand plundering, fire and the test of time. This video was made in collaboration with the South China Morning Post’s infographics team as part of their exploration of the Forbidden City’s Palace Museum.