Kimmy Chung

Kimmy Chung

Reporter, Hong Kong

Kimmy is a contributor to Inkstone. She reports on Hong Kong politics and Hong Kong-mainland issues for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong politics
Hong Kong's Covid-19 third wave ‘getting a bit out of hand’
Hong Kong is expected to tighten its social-distancing measures after a third wave of Covid-19 cases hit the city with health authorities warning the situation was "getting a bit out of hand." The city announced 52 new cases on Monday, in line with the recent escalation in cases, taking the total number of infections to 1,521, including seven deaths. Forty-one of the new cases were transmitted locally, and the source of 20 of these infections remained unknown. City officials met to discuss the new cases and were expected to further tighten social-distancing measures later in the day, having already reintroduced some restrictions last week. These included limiting restaurant customers to eig
A stench of disapproval, but Hong Kong passes national anthem law
Hong Kong’s legislature has passed a contentious bill that will make it illegal to insult the Chinese national anthem, despite attempts by opposition lawmakers to disrupt the vote. The Legislative Council voted 41 to one to pass the legislation on Thursday after foul-smelling liquid was twice released in the chamber and all but one of the city’s “pan-democrat” bloc stood up and abstained from voting in protest. Under the bill, anyone found guilty of misusing or insulting March of the Volunteers, the name of China's anthem, could be jailed for three years or fined up to $6,500. A special administrative region of China that enjoys a degree of autonomy, Hong Kong operates independently in matte
Tiananmen vigil has been banned, but Hongkongers aim to keep the flame alive
The cancellation of Hong Kong’s annual Tiananmen Square vigil for the first time in 30 years has upset political exiles, the event’s organizers and faithful participants who say the gathering to remember the bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing risks being permanently scrubbed from the calendar. Honoring lost lives with white flowers, lit candles, evocative songs and speeches has long been part of the annual vigil at the city’s Victoria Park – the only large-scale public gathering on Chinese soil to commemorate the crackdown, a taboo subject in mainland China but not in Hong Kong. Since 1990, the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China has held the vigil in remem
‘Hongkongers, revenge’: Student’s death prompts outpouring of grief and anger
Thousands of people across Hong Kong took to the streets, shopping malls and campuses on Friday to mourn a student who died from a fall during a clash between the police and protesters. Mourners joined impromptu rallies in the hours following the death of Chow Tsz-lok, a college student who fell from a parking lot on Monday while riot police dispersed crowds with tear gas nearby.  Hundreds of office workers marched in the Central business district, many wearing masks in defiance of a government ban on face covering and vowing to seek justice. “Blood for blood,” some marchers shouted. “Hongkongers, revenge.” The development could escalate tension in a city that has been rocked since June by
Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong barred from election
Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong has been banned from running in local elections next month, a move that could further fuel public anger at the city’s limited democracy underpinning months of social unrest. Wong was the only candidate disqualified from the polls, to be held on November 24, on the basis of his political stance. “The ban is clearly politically driven,” Wong said. “My disqualification will only trigger more people to take to the streets and vote in the coming elections.” Wong is a co-founder of the party Demosisto, whose founding mission is to strive for Hong Kong’s “self-determination.” The former British colony returned to Chinese rule in 1997 under the promise o
Hong Kong protesters vow to ramp up campaign after teenager shot
Peaceful and violent protesters alike vowed to be even more resolute in escalating their anti-government campaign in Hong Kong after a high school student was hit by a live round fired by a policeman under attack. Protesters called the shooting on Tuesday “a debt of blood” that would have to be paid, capping a day of all-out street violence across the city as they seized on the 70th birthday of Communist China to call on the government into meeting their demands.  On Wednesday, hundreds of people gathered at the financial district of Central to protest against the shooting, bringing traffic to a standstill.  Many demonstrators were office workers taking a lunch break. “We are seeing an escal
Murder suspect whose case sparked Hong Kong unrest to be freed
A Hong Kong man whose suspected killing of his girlfriend in Taiwan triggered a fiery extradition debate is to be freed from prison next month, the South China Morning Post has learned. The suspect, Chan Tong-kai, is currently imprisoned in Hong Kong for lesser charges associated with the dead woman, Poon Hiu-wing. While Chan has admitted to killing Poon, the man cannot be sent to the self-ruled island of Taiwan for a murder trial because the two places lack an extradition agreement. The Beijing-backed local government seized on the case to push for a bill that would have allowed Hong Kong to send fugitives to jurisdictions with which it had no extradition treaty, most controversially the ma
Hong Kong spent $1 million on PR blitz. It’s not very effective
The Hong Kong government has spent nearly $1 million on a global advertising campaign to convince the world that all is well in the city, despite the continuing anti-government demonstrations. The city’s authorities told the South China Morning Post that it has spent HK$7.4 million ($943,000) to place ads in newspapers in countries including the US, South Korea and Germany.  But industry experts said the official campaign paled in comparison to the public relations drive by the protesters in terms of both spending and success.  “The campaigns of the activists go beyond paid advertisements, as they earned publicity in media as well on reports of their tactics and creativity,” said Andy Ho On
Can Hong Kong stay part of China’s own Silicon Valley plan?
August and September are usually busy months for clothing trader Michael Hui Wah-kit, whose international clients arrive in Hong Kong for fashion shows and trade events. Buyers from Australia and Europe come to him for the latest casual wear produced by his suppliers on the Chinese mainland and in Southeast Asia. This year, two long-time clients decided not to come, put off by the ongoing anti-government protests in Hong Kong. They might go online and order directly from the manufacturers. Hong Kong entrepreneurs with factories in Guangdong province say their customers have been affected too. Dennis Ng Kwok-on, whose factory in Guangdong province supplies chemicals and machinery, said his cl