Kinling Lo

Kinling Lo

Reporter, China

Kinling is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a China reporter covering diplomacy and society news at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
China’s overseas investment, China diplomacy
The coronavirus has no cure, but here’s some treatment advice
With no cure to offer, China’s top health body has advised hospitals to use a range of treatments – including traditional Chinese medicine and “artificial lungs” – to tackle a deadly coronavirus. In guidelines published on Thursday afternoon, the National Health Commission advised that suspected cases be isolated. “Confirmed cases can be put in the same ward. Critical patients need to be put into intensive care as soon as possible,” the commission said. Patients requiring “basic treatment” should be given supplemental oxygen and antiviral medication. The new coronavirus, officially named 2019-nCoV, emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year and has killed 26 people, as of p
The coronavirus has no cure, but here’s some treatment advice
Gene-editing scientist jailed, denounced as seeking ‘fame and fortune’
The Chinese scientist who claimed to have created the world’s first gene-edited babies has been sentenced to three years in prison, a year after his research created a storm in the global scientific community.  He Jiankui, the scientist at the center of the controversy, and his two partners were convicted of “illegal practice of medicine” on Thursday for carrying out experiments that resulted in the births of three gene-edited babies, according to the state news agency Xinhua.  He Jiankui, former associate professor at Southern University of Science and Technology of China in Shenzhen, shocked the world in November 2018 when he announced that he had edited a pair of twin girls’ genes to prev
Gene-editing scientist jailed, denounced as seeking ‘fame and fortune’
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil
University students fleeing campus turmoil in Hong Kong can attend lectures at colleges in Taiwan to continue their studies, the Taiwanese authorities said on Wednesday. Students would be allowed to sit in on courses without credits for the rest of the school term, which runs from early December until January 3. “Regardless of whether they are from Taiwan or not, university students in Hong Kong whose studies have been interrupted by the protests in Hong Kong are welcome to register with a number of our universities here if they want to continue their studies,” Taiwan’s Ministry of Education said. Students who want to qualify for a degree would have to apply through the ministry. The offer
Taiwan opens doors to students fleeing Hong Kong turmoil
Beijing to prioritize turning Hongkongers into patriots
Beijing will call on Hong Kong to boost efforts to safeguard national security, a senior official said on Friday as anti-government protests in the semi-autonomous Chinese city entered their fifth month. Shen Chunyao, the head of a legislative committee overseeing the Basic Law, a constitutional document underpinning Chinese rule of the former British colony, spoke in Beijing following Thursday’s conclusion of a key Communist Party meeting. At that meeting, also known as the party’s third plenum, party leaders issued a communique highlighting the importance of the “one country, two systems” principle for governing Hong Kong and the former Portuguese colony of Macau. Here are the takeaways f
Beijing to prioritize turning Hongkongers into patriots
Chinese professor accused of spying banned from entering 26 Europe states
A Chinese professor who headed a Confucius Institute in Brussels has been barred from entering the 26 European countries that make up the Schengen zone for eight years after being accused of espionage, amid growing scrutiny of the Beijing-run cultural offices that have been established at universities around the world. Song Xinning, former director of the institute at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), said he had been accused by authorities in Belgium of supporting Chinese intelligence activities in the city – an accusation he denied. The Belgian newspaper De Morgen reported on Tuesday that VUB had ignored a warning from the State Security Service about the institute’s activities. The ar
Chinese professor accused of spying banned from entering 26 Europe states
Chinese reporter beaten in Hong Kong gets cash reward
A mainland Chinese journalist who was assaulted by anti-government protesters in Hong Kong last month has been rewarded with 100,000 yuan ($14,000) in cash by his employer, the Chinese nationalist newspaper Global Times. The reporter, Fu Guohao, received a hero’s welcome at home in the mainland after he was beaten by a mob of masked demonstrators at Hong Kong airport in August. Chinese state-run media outlets have seized on the attack to condemn the months-long pro-democracy protest movement in Hong Kong, which has increasingly ended in clashes between demonstrators and riot police and, in several instances, between demonstrators and their opponents. Fu became a target of the protesters’ wra
Chinese reporter beaten in Hong Kong gets cash reward
Embattled Hong Kong police get mooncakes from supporters in China
Hong Kong’s embattled police force has received 650 boxes of mooncakes sent from supporters in mainland China responding to an online campaign initiated by the country’s top law enforcement body. The cakes were delivered to police stations and the force’s dormitories ahead of the Mid- Autumn Festival, China’s most important holiday after the Lunar New Year, which is happening on Friday. The festive gifts were sent after an online campaign called “I want to send hometown delicacies to Hong Kong Police,” was launched last week by Chang An Jian, an official social media account of the Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, Beijing’s top political body responsible for law and order. Th
Embattled Hong Kong police get mooncakes from supporters in China
It’s hard to turn young Hongkongers into ‘patriotic youth’
When Kathy Tang (not her real name) and her fellow Hong Kong interns arrived at the fabled Palace Museum in Beijing’s Forbidden City in 2017, they received a red-carpet welcome. There were high hopes for this first batch of 15 young Hongkongers hand-picked by the Hong Kong government to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the city’s handover to China. The university students were to set an example for the next generation of Hongkongers: to be patriotic youth who were eager to “understand their mother country’s culture.” “We were being bused in and out, got exclusive access to areas that are off limits to tourists. They went out of their way to treat us as privileged guests valued and welcomed
It’s hard to turn young Hongkongers into ‘patriotic youth’
Is China threatening to use its ‘trump card’ on the US?
Chinese President Xi Jinping has visited a rare earth plant in what analysts describe as the latest show of strength, after Beijing switched to a tougher rhetoric amid the escalating trade war. China accounts for more than 90% of the global production of rare earths, a group of 17 chemical elements that are key components of high-tech and defense equipment, from laptops to electric vehicles to weapon systems. With the US relying heavily on imports from China, rare earths are among the few Chinese products the Trump administration has no plan yet to put tariffs on. On Monday, Xi visited JL Mag Rare-Earth, a major rare earths processing company in the eastern city of Ganzhou, sparking speculat
Is China threatening to use its ‘trump card’ on the US?
In trade talks, US prefers to reveal what China would conceal
The trade talks between China and the United States collapsed because Beijing removed details outlining the obligations it was required to meet as part of reaching a deal to end the trade war, according to a former senior US official. Susan Thornton, former acting assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs, said both sides had agreed on a time frame to gradually implement changes as they worked towards a final settlement. The Americans, however, wanted to set benchmarks on specific issues so they could be certain of the progress being made towards reaching the finished deal. “I heard there was a text the US side had given to the Chinese and it spelled out what the obliga
In trade talks, US prefers to reveal what China would conceal