Kinling Lo

Kinling Lo

Reporter, China

Kinling is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a China reporter covering diplomacy and society news at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
China’s overseas investment, China diplomacy
Ugly bickering as Chinese media mocks UK’s virus spread
A British politician has criticized China’s alleged Covid-19 cover-up after some Chinese media outlets blared headlines mocking the country for letting a more contagious mutant strain of the coronavirus rage across the UK. “New virus strain is out of control in the UK!” read a National Business Daily’s headline. “London’s Great Escape!” said China Youth Daily’s headline. The Global Times, which is considered the unfiltered mouthpiece of the Communist Party, published a cartoon showing British planes riddled with the virus. A British Member of Parliament, Tobias Ellwood from the Conservative Party, lashed out at the attacks, saying China “tried to hide the original outbreak,” The Sun newspape
‘Shy Trump voters' may prove decisive in 2020
US President Donald Trump stirred controversy on Sunday when he tweeted out a video of a fleet of trucks, flying Trump flags, apparently harassing a campaign bus for the campaign of candidate Joe Biden.  This political brashness has manifested itself in the US with Trump boat parties, sales of memorabilia far outstripping Biden gear and political rallies that are attended by thousands despite the country being the global center of the coronavirus pandemic.  But these people are unlikely to worry Biden supporters. They have already been “priced in” as the core of Trump’s base.  The unknowable potential voter block is the “shy Trump supporter”: those who are traditionally apolitical but have f
School principal sparks debate about becoming housewife
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. Girls’ school principal told housewife alumni to “get out” The principal of the first publicly funded girls' high school in China has triggered a heated debate on the internet by saying she is against her students becoming housewives, and that she despises them for relying on their husbands.  Zhang Guimei, the school principal of Huaping Senior High School for Girls in the southwestern Chinese province of Yunnan, has been praised by Chinese state media in the past as an educator well-known for her contribution to changi
This global coronavirus alliance was spurned by the US
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. In early October, China decided to join a global initiative for the fair distribution of Covid-19 vaccines called Covax.  The vaccine project had been struggling in part because major powers like China and the US were not participating. The US has refused to join the program, but Beijing’s participation might be what Covax needs to get the ball rolling.  But what exactly is it and how does it work? What is Covax? The Covid-19 Vaccine Global Access (Covax) alliance was launched in April by the World Health Organization (WHO), the European Commission and F
BTS face trial by Chinese social media over RM’s Korean War comments
K-pop group BTS has been targeted on Chinese social media over comments made about the Korean war, prompting some major brands to drop references to the band in online advertising. There was an angry reaction after the boy band’s leader RM told an awards ceremony that the South Korean band would always remember the country’s “history of pain” and shared “sacrifices” with the United States. The war began 70 years ago when North Korea invaded the South. A US-led coalition then joined the conflict on the side of the South, pushing the North’s troops back to the Chinese border, which prompted China to intervene on behalf of its communist ally. The conflict, which went on for three years, is offi
What are Confucius Institutes and why are some closing?
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. First set up in 2004 in South Korea, Confucius Institutes (CIs) are officially aimed at promoting Chinese language and culture around the world. These institutes, named after the country’s most renowned philosopher, are normally run as joint-ventures between Chinese and international universities, and are operated and partly funded under the auspices of the education ministry’s Chinese Language Council International, known as the Hanban. All CIs teach Chinese language and culture but their other offerings vary. Some offer credit-bearing courses to univers
China’s trying to promote a national language. Not everyone is pleased
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. China has been promoting the use of Mandarin as the country’s official language for decades, but this official push for “linguistic unity” has proved difficult in the vast country. China’s 1.4 billion residents speak hundreds of mutually unintelligible languages and dialects. National figures show that some 270 million people, or about one in five people, do not speak Mandarin. The official efforts to promote Mandarin have met resistance in regions with large ethnic minority populations who fear losing their culture and language. In August 2020, a governm
China Trends: Teenager jumps to death after being slapped, and demand for data protection
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. A teenager took his life after being slapped by his mother The tragic suicide of a 14-year-old boy who jumped off a school building after being slapped by his mother has rekindled debate about corporal punishment on children. In a surveillance video circulating on the Chinese internet, the student’s mother is seen slapping him twice and hitting him in the school’s hallway with a few other students around.  The boy’s teacher had called his parents in for a meeting after he was caught playing cards with two classmates at
US presidential election: China, Trump and red lines on Taiwan
For Beijing, there is one very clear red line on Taiwan. If the self-ruled island moves toward independence, Beijing has said that it would be justified in “reunifying” Taiwan with the mainland by force, a position it spelt out 15 years ago in its Anti-Secession Law. Despite dramatic lows and opposing stands in their relationship, both sides of the Taiwan Strait have so far managed to avoid crossing that line and engaging in a direct confrontation. But in the last few months, in the lead-up to the US presidential election, Washington has tried to capitalize on anti-China sentiment by offering strong support for the island. Beijing has branded the actions “US provocations” and promised to def
US-China tensions are getting worse in the South China Sea
China on Friday said it had warned off a US warship in the South China Sea that was deployed to the disputed waters after a Chinese missile launch in the latest of a series of escalating tensions in the region. The encounter followed China’s launch on Wednesday of its most advanced land-based anti-ship missile into the waterway, a move seen as a warning to the United States. Analysts said the launch of the missile might push the US to deploy more missiles and take a more aggressive stance toward Beijing, elevating the risk of an accidental armed conflict. According to a statement from the US Pacific Fleet, the guided-missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG-89) sailed into the vicinity of the Para