Kinling Lo

Kinling Lo

Reporter, China

Kinling is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a China reporter covering diplomacy and society news at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
China’s overseas investment, China diplomacy
Will China be ‘triumphant’ in 2050? US must prepare for it, think tank says
The United States should prepare for an “ascendant” Communist-led China, according to a report released by Rand Corporation, the US government-funded think tank. The compilers of China’s Grand Strategy: Trends, Trajectories and Long-Term Competition examined how successful the Chinese Communist Party was likely to be in achieving the goals it has set for the country by 2050. They considered four possible futures in which China is “triumphant” (having achieved all of its goals), “ascendant” (having achieved some), “stagnant” (having failed in its ambitions) or “imploding” (the regime is under threat). Compiled for the US military and published last week, the report concluded that “ascendant”
China’s top respiratory disease expert suggests mass Covid-19 testing in Hong Kong
China’s top respiratory disease expert Zhong Nanshan has urged the Hong Kong government to carry out citywide Covid-19 testing to contain its third wave of local infections. Hong Kong registered a triple-digit rise in Covid-19 cases for the eighth day running on Wednesday, pushing its total infections over 3,000 since its first coronavirus outbreak in late January. The city’s authorities are battling to manage the burden on local hospitals as a result of the surge and are facing the additional challenge that the origin of more than half of daily infections have been untraceable since mid-July. “My understanding is that Hong Kong people are now being tested on a voluntary basis,” Zhong said i
Why China pulls its punches when dealing with Washington
Beijing is trying to walk a fine line with Washington as it seeks to present a hardline stance to its domestic audience without causing irrevocable damage to the relationship. Analysts say that despite the so-called Wolf Warrior attitude of Chinese diplomats, official rhetoric and nationalistic online sentiment, Beijing has stopped short of overly provocative steps and has been unwilling or unable to retaliate with equal force to American diplomatic volleys. Tensions flared last week when the US ordered China’s consulate in Houston to close within 72 hours over alleged espionage activities. Beijing reacted by closing the American consulate in Chengdu, rather than shuttering a high-profile of
Quarantine centers beat self-isolation in fighting coronavirus, study says
Dedicated isolation facilities are key to ending the coronavirus pandemic, according to health experts in Singapore and London who compared home and government quarantine methods. The team created a theoretical city of 4 million people based on Singapore and used a simulation model to predict the spread of the virus under different policies. The results suggested that home-based quarantine reduced an infected person’s contact with other people by 50% in the home and 75% in the community, while institution-based isolation reduced contact by 75% in the household and 90% in the community.  The findings were published on April 29 in the medical journal The Lancet. “These results show the need f
The US and China are battling for influence. Who’s winning?
In 2018, President Xi Jinping said China would “take an active part in leading the reform of the global governance system” as part of an effort to build “a community with a shared future for humanity.” That message was vague enough to attract little attention, until the Covid-19 pandemic arrived, bringing upheaval and uncertainty, along with the potential to redraw the map of global power and influence.  The question then became: what would China’s role in global governance reform look like? The organization at the forefront of this debate has been the World Health Organization, which is on the front line in coordinating the fight against Covid-19. Critics – President Donald Trump prominent
Coronavirus researchers aren’t sure if airborne spread is possible
Scientists are exploring the possibility that the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 could be spread through the air over a much wider area than via coughs and sneezes.  However, the World Health Organization has urged caution, saying the available evidence has yet to support this. “Airborne transmissions” are defined as tiny aerosol droplets – smaller than 5 micrometers in diameter – that can linger in the air for hours. They can also spread the disease much farther than the 6 feet covered by the respiratory droplets, which are believed to be the primary means of spreading the disease. Aerosols can also cause more damage when inhaled because they travel further into the lungs. Hanan Balkhy,
Locust threat looms for Chinese farmers still reeling from coronavirus
China has raised its alert to prepare for the possibility that swarms of locusts that have laid waste to agricultural land in Pakistan, India and East Africa find their way across its borders, a government agency said on Monday. “Although experts believe that the risk of swarms entering the country and causing disaster is relatively low, [China] will be hampered in tracking the locusts by a lack of monitoring techniques and little knowledge of migration patterns [if they do] invade,” the National Forestry and Grassland Administration said in an emergency notice on its website. Beijing has convened a task force to watch for, control and – if possible – prevent the arrival of the voracious ins
Death sentence for man who killed two officials at coronavirus roadblock
A Chinese man was sentenced to death over the weekend for fatally stabbing two officials at a roadblock set up to contain the spread of the coronavirus in early February. A court in the southwestern province of Yunnan handed down the death sentence to 23-year-old Ma Jianguo on Sunday for the stabbings, which occurred on February 6. In a statement, the Intermediate People’s Court in Honghe Hani and Yi Autonomous Prefecture said: “Ma ignored national laws when Yunnan was at the most critical stage of a public health emergency. [He] ignored virus control policies, leading to the serious consequence of two lives being taken away. Such behavior is considered intentional murder.” Ma was traveling
The coronavirus has no cure, but here’s some treatment advice
With no cure to offer, China’s top health body has advised hospitals to use a range of treatments – including traditional Chinese medicine and “artificial lungs” – to tackle a deadly coronavirus. In guidelines published on Thursday afternoon, the National Health Commission advised that suspected cases be isolated. “Confirmed cases can be put in the same ward. Critical patients need to be put into intensive care as soon as possible,” the commission said. Patients requiring “basic treatment” should be given supplemental oxygen and antiviral medication. The new coronavirus, officially named 2019-nCoV, emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan late last year and has killed 26 people, as of p
Gene-editing scientist jailed, denounced as seeking ‘fame and fortune’
The Chinese scientist who claimed to have created the world’s first gene-edited babies has been sentenced to three years in prison, a year after his research created a storm in the global scientific community.  He Jiankui, the scientist at the center of the controversy, and his two partners were convicted of “illegal practice of medicine” on Thursday for carrying out experiments that resulted in the births of three gene-edited babies, according to the state news agency Xinhua.  He Jiankui, former associate professor at Southern University of Science and Technology of China in Shenzhen, shocked the world in November 2018 when he announced that he had edited a pair of twin girls’ genes to prev