Kok Xinghui

Kok Xinghui

Senior Reporter, Asia

Kok Xinghui is a contributor to Inkstone and a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Singapore
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Macroeconomics, social issues, Singapore politics
Singapore is going to start a travel bubble with Hong Kong 
Officials from Singapore and Hong Kong have agreed to a travel bubble that will allow leisure travel for almost all their residents without the need for quarantine or a controlled itinerary. In a media briefing on Thursday, Singapore transport minister Ong Ye Kung said local health care experts had endorsed the plan, which would require travelers from both sides to have spent 14 days in either city before departure. They will also need to present negative Covid-19 test results. Ong’s announcement, held at the same time Hong Kong’s secretary for commerce and economic development, Edward Yau Tang-wah, briefed the media, signaling that both sides have come to an agreement on most issues.  Neith
Why few Singapore health workers have caught the coronavirus
Uncooperative patients, long hours and a lack of protective equipment are hampering health care workers across the world as they take the fight to the coronavirus. Many health workers have fallen sick themselves, and a fair number have died. In Malaysia, a pregnant woman who did not disclose that her father was infected tested positive after giving birth, leading to the shutdown of the entire hospital for cleaning. In the Philippines, nine doctors have died, two of whom had dealt with a patient who lied about her travel history. In Spain, where more than 5,400 health care workers have been infected, accounting for about 14% of the country’s patients, there are no longer enough workers to ca
About that bat soup: spread of coronavirus and racism
As Singaporeans gathered over the Lunar New Year weekend, jokes were cracked about Chinese eating habits and how a propensity to eat “anything with four legs except the table and everything that flies except planes” had given rise to the Wuhan coronavirus. One meme said there was no need to worry – the virus would not last long because it was “made in China.” The jokes, tinged with racism, soon grew into a call for the city-state to ban Chinese travelers from entering. A change.org petition started on January 26 had 118,858 signatures as of Wednesday afternoon. Among those calling for health to be prioritized over tourism dollars was Ian Ong, who wrote: “We are not rat or bat eaters and shou