Kristin Huang

Kristin Huang

Senior Reporter, China Desk

Kristin Huang is a contributor to Inkstone and a senior China reporter at South China Morning Post. She is most interested in security topics in northeast Asia and China's growing military might.


Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
International relations, diplomacy, defence
Virus behind Chinese city’s pneumonia outbreak yet to be identified
The World Health Organization said it is in ongoing contact with the Chinese government over an unidentified outbreak of viral pneumonia in the central city of Wuhan, amid concern it may have been transmitted from animals. Wuhan health authorities on Tuesday said 27 people – most of them stallholders at the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market – had been treated at a local hospital, with seven said to be in serious condition. Pathology tests were under way to try and identify the virus, officials said.  The outbreak has sparked worries in China and reminded many of the 2002-03 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (Sars) in China, which killed several hundred people and is thought to have
Virus behind Chinese city’s pneumonia outbreak yet to be identified
Chinese warplanes step up drills for ‘unexpected confrontations’
China’s military has stepped up its exercises in the South China Sea to prepare for “unexpected confrontations,” according to a report in Sunday’s PLA Daily. China claims most of the South China Sea, a disputed resource-rich waterway which is also claimed by several neighboring countries.  But tensions have risen over the waters, with a Chinese destroyer almost colliding with a US warship in September last year. The report by the Chinese military mouthpiece said a naval aviation unit under the Southern Theater Command had completed a drill in which participants identified more than 10 kinds of “enemy” radio signals. “Different from the exercises conducted last year on early warning reconna
Chinese warplanes step up drills for ‘unexpected confrontations’
‘Go back to mainland’: Chinese fear becoming targets of Hong Kong protesters’ wrath
“I can’t understand why speaking Mandarin is now a sin in Hong Kong,” said “Mary,” a 35-year-old who works in the financial industry. A few weeks ago, the native of the southern province of Guangdong said she was chatting in Mandarin with a friend in Hong Kong when a young man walked past and began shouting obscenities at them and saying they should “go back to mainland China.” Mary (not her real name – she fears being bullied if her identity is revealed) said the incident left her shaken and upset. “I was so shocked at that moment. I couldn’t understand what prompted the man to do such a thing to us, as we didn’t know each other, and my friend and I were just talking about my newborn baby,”
‘Go back to mainland’: Chinese fear becoming targets of Hong Kong protesters’ wrath
This beach town is betting its future on Chinese money
Sihanoukville may be more than 2,000 miles away from Beijing, but it feels more like a Chinese city than a sleepy beach town in Cambodia. Everywhere, people can be heard speaking in Mandarin. Chinese restaurants have sprung up on dusty roads where huge construction sites – including for many hotels and more than 80 casinos – now dominate the skyline. This former fishing village in the country’s southwest used to be a favorite of backpackers. Now it is booming, and much of the development is being driven by Chinese money. But while the boom has created opportunities, it has also brought serious problems for Sihanoukville. Authorities say illegal gambling, prostitution and drug trafficking are
This beach town is betting its future on Chinese money
Why troops on Hong Kong streets are the ‘last thing’ Beijing wants to see
It is a prospect dreaded by many in Hong Kong, but a debate is growing on the mainland as to whether Beijing should end weeks of upheaval in the city by sending in the Chinese army. The People’s Liberation Army, or PLA, has had a presence in Hong Kong since the city’s return to Chinese sovereignty, but memories of the military’s bloody suppression of pro-democracy students and activists in Beijing in 1989 are still strong here three decades on. However, images of protesters vandalizing Beijing’s liaison office in the former British colony on Sunday have fanned nationalist anger across the border in mainland China, raising concerns about possible PLA intervention. Those concerns only deepen
Why troops on Hong Kong streets are the ‘last thing’ Beijing wants to see
Why China isn’t ready to invade Taiwan (at least not yet)
China is stepping up its military capability to invade Taiwan, but might lack the core assault landing capabilities to conquer the self-ruled island, military experts said. The assessment follows an annual report to the US Congress saying China was likely to be preparing a plan to take Taiwan by force, while simultaneously deterring, delaying, or denying any third-party intervention on the island’s behalf. The 136-page report, “Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China 2019,” was released last week and listed a number of options, including a blockade to cut off Taiwan’s imports accompanied by large-scale missile strikes and the occupation of Taiwanese admini
Why China isn’t ready to invade Taiwan (at least not yet)
American and British spy chiefs play down a split over Huawei
Spy chiefs in an American-led intelligence-sharing group have played down a split among member countries over the Chinese telecom giant Huawei. The Daily Telegraph reported that the United Kingdom – part of the Five Eyes spying alliance with the United States, Australia, Canada and New Zealand – agreed on Tuesday to allow Huawei to build noncore parts of the country’s 5G system. Britain’s reported decision set itself apart from Australia and the US, which have banned Huawei from their 5G networks entirely. Huawei, a leading manufacturer of equipment for next-generation 5G mobile networks, has faced resistance in some Western markets over fears Beijing could spy on communications and gain a
American and British spy chiefs play down a split over Huawei
Former US official says she took China’s gifts and turned over documents
A former US State Department office manager pleaded guilty on Wednesday for hiding extensive contacts with two Chinese intelligence agents. Candace Claiborne, the 63-year-old manager, admitted that she and her family members received tens of thousands of dollars in cash and gifts in exchange for diplomatic and economic information China wanted, the US Department of Justice said on Wednesday. The case comes amid Washington's heightened alarm over what it considers Beijing’s increasing economic espionage against the US. FBI director Christopher Wray, a member of an initiative launched in November to counter Beijing’s economic spying, said “no country presents a broader, more severe threat” to
Former US official says she took China’s gifts and turned over documents
These sisters in rural China made a library from trash
The tiny, dimly-lit library had no bookshelves and hardly enough books to fill a cabinet. But for the children in the central Chinese province of Henan, it was a godsend. A pair of sisters built the mini-library in 2016 using books they salvaged from the trash they picked up in a township in Henan called Yangmiaoxiang, one of the poorest parts of China where families live on less than $1 a day. The story of hardship behind the library underscores the staggering inequality between China’s coastal cities and inland regions and the challenges Beijing faces as it seeks to eradicate poverty by 2020. “China’s education resources’ distribution is extremely uneven,” said a user of Weibo, China’s Tw
These sisters in rural China made a library from trash
A deadly pig virus has spread all over China
A swine fever epidemic has spread to all parts of China, decimating the country’s hog industry and disrupting Chinese dinner tables. The island province of Hainan has confirmed its first cases of African swine fever, meaning the pig-killing virus has spread to all 31 mainland Chinese provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions since the first infection in the country was confirmed in August. The spread of African swine fever has disrupted the supply of pork in China, which raises about half the world's pigs. Financial services firm Rabobank estimates that China is set to lose up to 200 million pigs to the disease or culling, and there is not enough pork in "the whole world combined" to
A deadly pig virus has spread all over China