Lea Li

Lea Li

Video Producer

Lea is a contributor to Inkstone and a multimedia producer specializing in video and motion graphics at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Video production
Hundreds of thousands march in Hong Kong
Hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers took to the streets on December 8, 2019, the day before the six-month anniversary of the anti-government protests. For the first time since August, the Civil Human Rights Front, the organizer of the march, received a letter of no objection from the police.
Hundreds of thousands march in Hong Kong
Hundreds in Hong Kong don Guy Fawkes masks in protest
Hundreds of anti-government protesters gathered on Tuesday night a month since the introduction of a mask ban in Hong Kong, marching through the tourist hotspot of Tsim Sha Tsui. Police deployed a water cannon to disperse the crowd. Many demonstrators wore the smiling masks made famous by the 2005 dystopian film V for Vendetta. The masks commemorate Guy Fawkes, a British figure whose failed bid to blow up parliament in 1605 is remembered in the UK every year on November 5. In recent years, the masks have become a familiar sight at protests around the world.
Hundreds in Hong Kong don Guy Fawkes masks in protest
‘President Trump, please liberate Hong Kong!’
Thousands of Hong Kong protesters – some waving American flags – filled Hong Kong streets on Monday night to ask the US government and President Trump for help. They urged the US Congress to pass a bill that would sanction and penalize Beijing and Hong Kong officials deemed to have suppressed “basic freedoms” in the city.
‘President Trump, please liberate Hong Kong!’
The people behind Hong Kong’s protest media
Hong Kong protesters are not only taking their message to the streets. Thousands are volunteering to create graphics, posters, videos and other content meant to promote their cause. In the video above, we speak with a member of an informal public relations (PR) team that supports the movement. One of the members, who goes by “Y,” designed a bloodstained version of the city’s bauhinia flag that has become a symbol of the protests.
The people behind Hong Kong’s protest media
Hong Kong train derails during rush hour
A passenger train in Hong Kong has derailed for the first time, leading to a service suspension during rush hour on Tuesday. Services on the city’s railway system between Mong Kok East and Hung Hom stations in Kowloon were suspended after three carriages came off the tracks on Tuesday morning. At least eight passengers were injured. 
Hong Kong train derails during rush hour
The art fueling Hong Kong’s protests
Amid anti-government protests that have rocked Hong Kong for nearly three months, some artists who support the movement talk about the works they have created to express their feelings about the movement or to offer support for demonstrators.
The art fueling Hong Kong’s protests
Police fire shot, water cannons in Hong Kong protests
For the first time in 12 weekends of anti-government protests in Hong Kong, a police officer fired a warning shot during clashes with demonstrators on Sunday. Earlier in the day, police also deployed water cannons for the first time, threatening to use them in order to disperse hundreds of protesters who had occupied a road following a march.
Police fire shot, water cannons in Hong Kong protests
Hundreds protest student arrest with laser show
Hundreds have rallied at a tourist hotspot in Hong Kong to demand the release of a student arrested for carrying laser pointers. Keith Fong, president of Hong Kong Baptist University’s student union, was arrested Monday on suspicion of possessing “offensive weapons.” The university's faculty, students and alumni of the university held rallies to condemn the police for spreading “white terror” and demanded Fong’s release. Laser pointers have been commonly seen in anti-government protests in Hong Kong, apparently to confuse police officers or deter bystanders from taking photographs that could help to identify protesters.
Hundreds protest student arrest with laser show
Hong Kong couple facing riot charges ties the knot
A couple facing riot charges in Hong Kong have tied the knot. Dozens of friends, family members and supporters packed a registration room to witness the wedding ceremony for Tong Wai-hung and Elaine To on August 4, 2019. The couple, who co-own a private gym in Central, were arrested on July 28 during a police operation to clear anti-extradition law protesters in Sheung Wan. They were each charged with one count of rioting, which can carry a sentence of up to 10 years in prison. They are among 44 people in the first batch of suspects arrested in protests for such offenses.
Hong Kong couple facing riot charges ties the knot
Hong Kong’s Christian protesters
Christians are playing an important role in Hong Kong’s ongoing protests, which aim to preserve the city’s freedoms and autonomy.  While the Chinese government has been accused of cracking down on religious freedom in the mainland, religious groups in the former British colony of Hong Kong are flourishing.  During the campaign against a now-dead extradition bill, Christians were among those taking to the streets. Churches have become temporary support centers. The hymn ‘Sing Hallelujah to the Lord’ has become the unofficial protest anthem for Christians and non-Christians.  As clashes erupted between protesters and police over the weekend, some Christians tried to reduce tensions between the
Hong Kong’s Christian protesters