Lea Li

Lea Li

Video Producer

Lea is a contributor to Inkstone and a multimedia producer specializing in video and motion graphics at the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Video production
Hong Kong bookstores feel pressure of security law
Political books about Hong Kong’s democratic movement, gossip about Chinese leaders, and rumors about politics on the Chinese mainland were once readily available at newsstands and convenience stores across the city. But many books considered to be "sensitive" have disappeared from the shelves after Beijing imposed a national security law for Hong Kong in July 2020. The change is a worry for many in Hong Kong, including an independent bookstore owner who fears the new law could eventually have a serious impact on his business
Hongkongers defy ban to mark Tiananmen crackdown
Hong Kong marked the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown amid a police ban on the annual Victoria Park vigil because of Covid-19 social distancing restrictions. Thousands defied the ban and gathered in the park anyway. Elsewhere in the city, people gathered to light candles and held a moment of silence to commemorate those who died in the crackdown on June 4, 1989. 
‘Two sessions’ explained: China’s most important political meetings of the year
China normally holds its most important annual political meetings in March, when the top political advisory body and national legislature gather. But in 2020, the meetings were postponed to May 22, 2020 because of the coronavirus pandemic. Although the “two sessions” take place only days apart on the political calendar, the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress (CPPCC) and the National People’s Congress (NPC) are two very distinct gatherings. Here’s a closer look at how the two sessions, known as lianghui in Chinese, shape the nation’s policies.
How Covid-19 has disrupted air travel
Airline tracking site Flight Radar 24 documented a massive reduction in the number of aircraft flying around the world as the new coronavirus spread after it was first reported in central China. The International Air Transport Association predicts that air traffic in 2020 may fall by at least 38%.
Police, public clash over border reopening in China
Chinese police officers from two provinces clashed with each other and members of the public on March 27 in a dispute over the reopening of a provincial border following weeks of quarantine measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus.
Hundreds of thousands march in Hong Kong
Hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers took to the streets on December 8, 2019, the day before the six-month anniversary of the anti-government protests. For the first time since August, the Civil Human Rights Front, the organizer of the march, received a letter of no objection from the police.
Hundreds in Hong Kong don Guy Fawkes masks in protest
Hundreds of anti-government protesters gathered on Tuesday night a month since the introduction of a mask ban in Hong Kong, marching through the tourist hotspot of Tsim Sha Tsui. Police deployed a water cannon to disperse the crowd. Many demonstrators wore the smiling masks made famous by the 2005 dystopian film V for Vendetta. The masks commemorate Guy Fawkes, a British figure whose failed bid to blow up parliament in 1605 is remembered in the UK every year on November 5. In recent years, the masks have become a familiar sight at protests around the world.
‘President Trump, please liberate Hong Kong!’
Thousands of Hong Kong protesters – some waving American flags – filled Hong Kong streets on Monday night to ask the US government and President Trump for help. They urged the US Congress to pass a bill that would sanction and penalize Beijing and Hong Kong officials deemed to have suppressed “basic freedoms” in the city.
The people behind Hong Kong’s protest media
Hong Kong protesters are not only taking their message to the streets. Thousands are volunteering to create graphics, posters, videos and other content meant to promote their cause. In the video above, we speak with a member of an informal public relations (PR) team that supports the movement. One of the members, who goes by “Y,” designed a bloodstained version of the city’s bauhinia flag that has become a symbol of the protests.
Hong Kong train derails during rush hour
A passenger train in Hong Kong has derailed for the first time, leading to a service suspension during rush hour on Tuesday. Services on the city’s railway system between Mong Kok East and Hung Hom stations in Kowloon were suspended after three carriages came off the tracks on Tuesday morning. At least eight passengers were injured.