Lee Jeong-ho

Lee Jeong-ho

Reporter, China

Jeong-ho is a contributor to Inkstone. He covers China's diplomacy, East Asian security and defense for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Korean
Areas of Expertise
Chinese diplomacy, Northeast Asian security, politics
One of China’s most successful investors is quietly leaving
Large South Korean firms have historically been among the most successful investors in China. But, they’ve been gradually withdrawing from the country, in order to avoid tariffs on exports of their China-made products to the US and to head off a repeat of a major political crisis.  Many analysts say the efforts of South Korean firms in China should be essential study material for Western governments and businesses about the political risks of doing business in the mainland. These risks are growing as the US-China trade war threatens to draw in other nations and expand into a broader geopolitical struggle. In 2016, Seoul agreed to a long-standing request from the United States to allow the d
One of China’s most successful investors is quietly leaving
What’s behind Xi Jinping’s meeting with Kim Jong-un?
China's President Xi Jinping touched down in Pyongyang on Thursday, making him the first Chinese leader to visit North Korea in almost 15 years. The meeting between Xi and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un comes at an important time for both nations. Each needs to get something out of this trip. North Korea is looking for a new way to boost its economy, and China needs a bargaining chip in the form of a denuclearized North Korea to bring to its talks with the US. In the video above, we spoke with South China Morning Post reporter Lee Jeong-ho, who covers the Korean peninsula, about what this meeting means.
What’s behind Xi Jinping’s meeting with Kim Jong-un?
China’s defense chief says the Tiananmen crackdown was ‘correct’
China’s defense minister offered a stern justification of Beijing’s bloody crackdown on the 1989 pro-democracy movement days before its symbolic 30th anniversary. Speaking at the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore, Wei Fenghe said the Tiananmen crackdown had contributed to China’s prosperity in a rare public address on the event. “That incident was political turbulence,” he said on Sunday at the annual Asia defense summit, in response to a question from the audience. “The central government’s measures to stop that turbulence was correct. China has enjoyed stable development.” Tuesday marks 30 years since the Chinese military opened fire at protesters in Beijing after demonstrations demanding
China’s defense chief says the Tiananmen crackdown was ‘correct’
Poorly organized and tightly controlled: inside China’s Belt and Road party
Trying to dispel foreign skepticism over its Belt and Road initiative, Beijing held a three-day summit last week gathering foreign leaders and delegates from 150 countries. But traffic woes, poor organization and tight media control during the forum – China’s most important diplomatic event of the year – have raised questions over its ability to project soft power. Poor organization Lack of a clear schedule often left attendees either waiting for hours on end or scrambling to catch up after an event started suddenly. One delegate from a European country complained that the forum was chaotic, saying there was no clear agenda provided – only a schedule giving time slots for speakers. Televisio
Poorly organized and tightly controlled: inside China’s Belt and Road party
China wants the US and North Korea to meet ‘halfway’
North Korea and China appear to be further cozying up to each other as a crucial new round of denuclearization talks nears.  President Xi Jinping of China accepted an offer to visit the North Korean capital of Pyongyang after he met with the country’s leader Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s state media reported on Thursday. And Xi effectively vouched for what North Korea considers its denuclearization effort, which the US hasn’t deemed sufficient progress for it to ease its crippling sanctions against the country. “China supports the DPRK’s continued adherence to the direction of denuclearization on the peninsula, supports the continuous improvement of inter-Korean relations,” Xi was quoted as say
China wants the US and North Korea to meet ‘halfway’
Kim Jong-un checks in with China before meeting Trump
On his 35th birthday, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un took a trip to China. But this was no destination party. He arrived in Beijing by train on Tuesday for what are said to be talks with Chinese leaders in preparation for his second meeting with President Donald Trump. Besides, unlike his predecessors, whose birthdays are public holidays in North Korea, Kim has not been known for marking the occasion with anything ostentatious since he took office in 2011. The trip comes at a delicate moment in the relationship between North Korea and the United States. Denuclearization talks between the countries have stalled, even as Kim said in his new year speech that he was willing to meet with Trump
Kim Jong-un checks in with China before meeting Trump
He built a career on North Korea. Now China’s come for him
As a young man from Alberta on a trip to Seoul in the late ’90s, Michael Spavor picked up a Lonely Planet travel guide and came across a few pages about North Korea in the back of the book. He was instantly hooked. “It was the most interesting part of the whole book,” he told current affairs magazine Maclean’s in an interview in 2013. Spavor set out to find out more. He not only learned fluent Korean, but also spent more than a decade living in and around North Korea. His cultural exchange business took visitors from around the world – including ex-NBA star Dennis Rodman – to the isolated northeast Asian country. And he even became personal friends with Kim Jong-un, the leader of the hermit
He built a career on North Korea. Now China’s come for him
In Brazil, China-bashing crowns a populist president
China skeptics are having a moment among voters around the world. Brazil, the largest economy in Latin America, elected far-right politician Jair Bolsonaro as president over the weekend. An ardent nationalist and admirer of President Donald Trump, on the campaign trail Bolsonaro repeatedly accusing China’s investments in Brazil of hampering the country’s security. “China isn’t buying in Brazil. China is buying Brazil. This is a big problem that we should be worried about,” 63-year-old Bolsonaro said in the months leading up to the election. “Are you willing to leave Brazil in the hands of the Chinese?” In Brazil, China’s investments hit a seven-year high of $25 billion last year. From 2012 t
In Brazil, China-bashing crowns a populist president
What’s stopping peace in Korea? It’s not who you’d think
What do South Koreans see as the biggest barrier to peace? A nuclear-capable neighbor run by an all-powerful leader who has actively suppressed dissent to consolidate his control. But that country isn’t North Korea – it’s China. First the first time, China has surpassed North Korea as the country presenting the biggest barrier to peace on the Korean Peninsula, according to a new poll of South Korean citizens. In the survey, released on Tuesday by the Institute for Peace and Unification Studies (IPUS) at Seoul National University, 46% of respondents viewed China as “the most threatening country to peace on the Korean Peninsula.” That’s a dramatic increase from 2016, when that number was just
What’s stopping peace in Korea? It’s not who you’d think
North and South Korea inch closer to peace
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has agreed to dismantle his main nuclear complex if the United States takes unspecified measures, South Korean President Moon Jae-in said after a landmark meeting in Pyongyang. The pledge was made on Wednesday in a joint declaration and press conference by the two leaders after a summit at the Paekhwawon official guest house on the outskirts of the North Korean capital. Moon is on a three-day trip to North Korea for his third summit with Kim this year, hoping to reboot stalled denuclearization talks between his host and the United States. “The South and the North shared the view that the Korean Peninsula should be a region without nuclear weapons nor nuclear
North and South Korea inch closer to peace