Lilian Cheng

Lilian Cheng

Lilian is a contributor to Inkstone and a senior reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Hong Kong housing, land issues, heritage preservation, society
Hong Kong's Covid-19 third wave ‘getting a bit out of hand’
Hong Kong is expected to tighten its social-distancing measures after a third wave of Covid-19 cases hit the city with health authorities warning the situation was "getting a bit out of hand." The city announced 52 new cases on Monday, in line with the recent escalation in cases, taking the total number of infections to 1,521, including seven deaths. Forty-one of the new cases were transmitted locally, and the source of 20 of these infections remained unknown. City officials met to discuss the new cases and were expected to further tighten social-distancing measures later in the day, having already reintroduced some restrictions last week. These included limiting restaurant customers to eig
Hongkongers convicted under new security law could be imprisoned for life
People convicted of crimes under a new national security law Beijing is imposing on Hong Kong could face life imprisonment, sources told the South China Morning Post. China’s top legislative body on Sunday kicked off a special three-day meeting fast-tracking the legislation, which is being tailor-made for the former British colony to prevent, stop and punish acts of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces to endanger national security. Opposition politicians and critics said the bill could be used to suppress dissent and erode freedoms in the city, which is governed under a “one country, two systems” framework that gives Hong Kong considerable autonomy.  The legisl
Hong Kong’s Tiananmen vigil goes ahead, with a new generation galvanized
Hong Kong’s annual Tiananmen Square vigil gained fresh urgency as people defied a ban to gather on Thursday to remember the 1989 crackdown. In recent years, the organizer of the annual vigil had faced questions about its relevance from young people who dismissed it as naive and idealistic for caring about democratic change over the border in mainland China. But this time, Hong Kong activists put aside such differences in the face of a looming threat: a national security law to be imposed on their city by China’s central government, which could come into effect within weeks. Many feared the law – which Beijing says will “prevent, stop and punish” secession, subversion, terrorism and foreign i
Coronavirus could cause ‘disastrous’ global food shortages
The coronavirus pandemic could disrupt global food supply chains and send prices soaring, international agencies and experts have warned. Export restrictions imposed by major producing countries could especially hurt economies with vulnerable supply structures, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization said last week. And the UN Committee on World Food Security warned that “disruptions at borders and in supply chains may cause an echo in the food system with potentially disastrous effects.” The warnings highlight the potential damage of the coronavirus outbreak beyond its immediate toll on the at least 700,000 people it has sickened in nearly 200 countries. “Coupled with the curr
Hong Kong says another dog has tested positive for the coronavirus
A second dog with an infected owner has caught the coronavirus, the Hong Kong government said on Thursday. But like the first dog that tested positive for the virus early this month, the 2-year-old German Shepherd showed no signs of the Covid-19 disease that has sickened more than 240,000 people worldwide, the city’s animal welfare authority said in a statement. “It is very likely that the two positive cases are examples of human-to-dog transmission,” Professor Malik Peiris, a leading public health virologist at the University of Hong Kong, who helped the government analyze the specimens, told the South China Morning Post. Peiris said that a blood test would be performed, but added the sampl
McDonald’s outlet runs out of food as Hong Kong protests hit hard
Residents in one Hong Kong town have been hit hard by the anti-government protests sweeping the city this week – their local McDonald’s is running out of food. With radicals bringing major roads, tunnels and the subway system to a standstill this week, people have struggled to get in or out of parts of Hong Kong. It has left some neighborhoods, like the district of Tai Po, in semi-isolation. Restaurants and supermarkets have run low on supplies as well. Residents hoping to get breakfast at their local McDonald’s on Thursday discovered the only items on the menu were pancakes or macaroni. A staff member at one McDonald’s said they ran out of some buns, including Sausage McMuffins, and hash br
Hong Kong police deny their dogs are hurt by tear gas
Hong Kong police have denied accusations that their dogs have either died or fallen sick as a direct result of tear gas being fired during the anti-government protests. On Thursday morning, the police force posted a 20-second video on Facebook, showing a police dog playing and following basic instructions. The clip, which quickly attracted thousands of views, was aimed at dispelling rumors that some dogs had been harmed by tear gas.  “We understand public concern about police dogs’ health, so every handler takes good care of his or her ‘partner,’” the video says. “Never believe in unverified rumor!” But many Facebook users left comments on the video, asking police to stop using dogs in prote