Louise Moon

Louise Moon

Reporter, Business

Louise is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Markets coverage, Hong Kong companies, consumer sector
I just moved to Beijing. This is my experience with mobile payments
“You might not have to make that trip to the bank after all,” Rob, a friend, messaged me over WeChat the other day. He attached a press release saying Alipay had launched an international version of its mobile payments platform for visitors to China. Named “Tour Pass,” the app can be used for up to 90 days and could prove handy for me, as I had moved from Hong Kong to Beijing for three months just over a month ago. The last time I lived in Beijing, five years ago while studying at Peking University, cash was still currency, shared bikes did not exist and people did not have their morning Starbucks delivered via an app. Since then China has transformed into an almost cashless society at an ex
Jeremy Lin says he’s open to moving to China
Jeremy Lin, currently an unrestricted free agent, says he’s considering playing in the Chinese Basketball Association. “Of course I am thinking about the CBA,” Lin told reporters in the Chinese megacity of Guangzhou on Friday. “I don’t know where I will be next year, so I don’t have expectations. I know what level I can play at, so if I don’t get that I won’t settle.” Lin, who left the Toronto Raptors this summer after winning the NBA championship with them, was speaking at a press conference to launch his role as a brand ambassador for Chinese sportswear brand Xtep.  He will be the pitchman fronting four models of basketball shoes featuring “Linsanity” stitching, which will be available in
A look inside China’s sports shoe capital
Over four decades, Jinjiang in China’s southeastern province of Fujian transformed into a sportswear-production powerhouse, specializing in shoes. Today, the companies based in China's "shoe capital" are aiming big, hoping to expand beyond the domestic market. The South China Morning Post traveled to Jinjiang to find out how local brands are becoming big names in China, poised to take on industry leaders like Nike and Adidas.
In China, the family business is out and the business family is in
In China’s rise to become an economy to rival the United States, few played a role as key as the country’s private companies. These businesses are mostly run by men, usually in manufacturing and real estate, and nearly all owned by families. But like in many families, things can get tricky when it comes to succession. China is about to be hit by a wave of retirements of aging business titans who don’t always have a solid plan for what’s next – or even children who want to carry on the family business.  This is a problem for not just the companies, but also the country as a whole, as it seeks to shift its economy’s reliance from manufacturing to advanced technology. The quality and success of
Man behind ‘gene-edited babies’ has $40 million in start-up funding
Dr He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who claims to have created the world’s first gene-edited babies, has received at least $40 million (298 million yuan) in funding for his two biotech start-ups from Chinese and international investors.  He has defended his work against a chorus of criticism from scientists, who questioned the ethics and medical justification for his use of gene-editing technology on humans.  The global gene modification therapy market is rapidly growing and is expected to reach $17.4 billion by the end of 2023, according to BCC Research. This doesn’t include editing human embryos and implanting them in a mother’s womb, which is banned in much of the world. He claimed that
What body language tells us about Kim and Trump
A battle played out between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un on Tuesday morning. The arena? Body language. The entrance Both leaders arrived without a trace of a smile.  Kim pulled up first, a few minutes before 9am, with a stiff look on his face and carrying a notebook. US body language expert Patti Wood suggested this is more significant than it seemed.  “It tells us he is not planning to be off-the-cuff in the meeting,” she said. “Having other people carry his artefacts is his baseline. It may indicate more concern that he be prepared for the meeting.” Here’s the footage of their first meeting. Five minutes later, Trump emerged from his bulletproof car, known as “The Beast,” without a smile
Bored kids, big brother is watching you
Bored Chinese schoolkids are out of luck, thanks to the unstoppable rise of facial recognition tech. A school in eastern China has installed cameras in classrooms to monitor pupils’ facial expressions and attentiveness in class, an online news portal has reported. A series of photos published on the Sina News website on Wednesday show three cameras installed on top of the blackboard at the 11th middle school in Hangzhou, in the eastern Chinese province of Zhejiang. The cameras, which the report described as “teaching assistants,” are part of the school’s “Smart Classroom Behavior Management System” intended to give teachers real-time information on their students. The school said it could u
Chinese workers slapped, forced to crawl in punishment
A viral video showing Chinese employees being slapped in the face and crawling on the floor has prompted renewed criticism of workplace bullying in the country. In a video circulating on social media, a woman was seen slapping six of her subordinates as they stood to attention in a line. Next a group of men, all wearing company uniforms, were shown crawling around in a circle, while chanting. The clips were taken during a performance appraisal session last month at a real estate company in Yichang, Hubei province in central China, news portal Thepaper.cn reported. The video caused outrage on the Twitter-like social network Weibo. “Corporate culture these days is getting more and more sick,”