Marcelo Duhalde

Marcelo Duhalde

Infographic Designer

Marcelo Duhalde is a contributor to Inkstone and an infographic designer for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Spanish
Areas of Expertise
Infographics, visual journalism, illustration
‘Famines of biblical proportions’: How coronavirus threatens food supply
The coronavirus pandemic is putting immense stress on each link of the food supply, from agricultural production to transportation to distribution. Besides taking care of patients suffering from the virus itself, governments around the world are facing the challenge of protecting their population from higher food prices or even shortage. The head of the United Nations food agency warned on April 21 that the pandemic could cause “famines of biblical proportions within a few short months” unless food access is secured. Food supply chain refers to the process of delivering food, from farm to table, includes production, processing, distribution, consumption and waste disposal. In the globalized
Getting home for Lunar New Year
It is the 2020 Lunar New Year holiday, and 11-year-old Xiaoxiao and her little brother are at home with their grandparents in a remote part of central China. They are anxiously waiting for the Spring Festival reunion dinner when their parents return from their jobs in southern Guangdong province. Like hundreds of millions of rural migrant workers in China, Chen and Liu travel home only once a year. The travel rush over the holiday period, which lasts up to 40 days, is considered the largest annual human migration in the world.
China’s rust belt is struggling to regain life
For more than a century, coal was the center of life for the residents of Fushun, 30 miles from the Liaoning provincial capital of Shenyang, earning the city the nickname “capital of coal.” But with viable reserves exhausted and a lack of technology and money to safely operate deeper underground, its mines have been closing down one by one over the past two decades, leading to the neglect and eventual abandonment of the neighborhoods around them in northeastern China Of Fushun’s four main mines, Shengli was the first to shut, followed by the Longfeng mine. Last year, the city’s coal production fell to 5.83 million tons, a fraction of what was produced in its heyday in the 1960s and 1970s. I
How Chinese emperors ate
For the emperor, life in the Forbidden City was not as opulent as one might imagine. While each dynasty claimed the emperor was heaven’s earthly representative, the emperor did not routinely feasted on lavish meals. His diet was balanced, but surprisingly plain. Both the Ming and Qing dynasties ate in accordance with the same principle: a diet must promote health.     Feeding his majesty The scale of infrastructure needed to provide food was immense. The imperial kitchen was composed of three parts: the main kitchen, tea kitchen and bakery. Each had a chef and five cooks, a supervisor and an accountant who procured and tracked supplies. Menus always carried the cook’s name so that dishes cou
How and why men became eunuchs in imperial China
The presence of eunuchs in the Forbidden City, the ancient home to many Chinese emperors, was a long-standing tradition. These emasculated men served as palace menials, spies and harem watchdogs. An army of eunuchs was attached to the court, primarily to safeguard the imperial ladies’ chastity. Confucian values deemed it vital for the emperor, seen as heaven’s representative on Earth, to produce a direct male heir to maintain harmony between heaven and Earth. Not wanting to leave anything to chance during a period with a high infant mortality rate, the world’s largest harem was placed at the emperor’s disposal to ensure enough heirs would survive into adulthood.     A 2,000-year system Cour