Mark Magnier

Mark Magnier

US correspondent

Mark Magnier is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a US correspondent for South China Morning Post based in Washington.

Location
Washington DC
Language spoken
English
Areas of Expertise
US-China relations and policy
US to boost soft power with Mandarin network
The US government is planning a major new Mandarin-language initiative in an effort to bolster its global reputation at a time of Chinese ascendancy and eroding American soft power. Voice of America (VOA) and Radio Free Asia (RFA) are joining forces on a new network called Global Mandarin, according to internal memos, job placement advertisements and interviews with people close to Washington’s information arms. Its annual budget would be between $5 million and $10 million, potentially rising in the second year, according to a source who requested anonymity given links to the networks. It would focus on softer content aimed at reaching younger Chinese in the US, China and beyond. The US roll
US to boost soft power with Mandarin network
Alarm in US over China’s recruitment of scientists
The Federal Bureau of Investigation has deployed counter-intelligence agents in all 56 US field offices and centralized efforts to thwart China’s aggressive theft of strategic secrets and its recruitment of American scientists, according to Senate testimony on Tuesday. Field offices are command posts spread across American cities that are used to carry out local and regional operations.  “Technology is the key to military and economic power,” John Brown, assistant director of the FBI’s counter-intelligence division, told the US Senate’s Homeland Security and Government Affairs Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. “Time and again the Communist Party has shown that it will do whatever is
Alarm in US over China’s recruitment of scientists
Why Chinese students keep coming to the US (for now)
Sun Hang, a 19-year-old first-year student from eastern China’s Zhejiang province, decided to study in the United States at George Washington University despite his concern about growing US-China tensions and the US government’s increasingly restrictive visa policy. “It will allow me to have a good resume, get a good job in China and enjoy myself,” said Sun, a history major dressed in a long black coat against the cold.  “US education is much better” than that in Australia or England, partly because of its better reputation, he added.  The allure of a US education for many Chinese appears, at first glance, to be holding firm.  Despite the US-China trade war, growing mutual distrust and a ram
Why Chinese students keep coming to the US (for now)
Why China’s tech workforce can’t gain traction in Silicon Valley
While Indian tech workers have flourished in the US, their Chinese counterparts have struggled to gain the same acceptance. Growing distrust between Beijing and Washington, fuelled by the trade war, has heightened suspicion of Chinese in the industry, but the problems they face go deeper, and have been evident for some time. In September 2015, Chinese President Xi Jinping landed in Seattle, Washington, to meet with corporate titans at Amazon, Apple, Boeing and Microsoft. There he encouraged them to set up research and development centers in China and partner on information technology and other sectors prioritized by “Made in China 2025,” a strategic tech blueprint aimed at upgrading Chinese
Why China’s tech workforce can’t gain traction in Silicon Valley
Why a Chinese chemical firm dropped its Louisiana plant
In the latest setback for Chinese companies investing in the US during the current trade war, a state-owned chemical firm is hitting the pause button on a $1.25 billion plant in Louisiana. Chinese firms operating in the US are facing growing headwinds amid a grinding tariff showdown, mutual recriminations and mounting visa and security restrictions as the world’s two largest economies battle for pole position. William Day, a manager with Wanhua Chemical Group Co’s US operation, said the company “decided to change the scope of the project” citing higher capital costs, adding that the company was still looking for US sites to build the massive plant at a later time. The setback comes as a grow
Why a Chinese chemical firm dropped its Louisiana plant
Fearing new ‘red scare,’ Chinese-American activists fight back
As more Chinese-Americans find themselves targeted in the increasingly bitter stand-off between Beijing and Washington, legislators, community groups and legal experts are pushing back in hopes of sending a message that enough is enough. Prime objects of their frustration are the US government’s justice and intelligence communities, which have investigated and filed a slew of cases against scientists of Chinese origin on industrial espionage, theft of trade secrets and other charges. Chinese-Americans readily acknowledge that Beijing targets people of Chinese descent and that the US has every right to defend itself. But a disproportionate number of recent cases end up snaring innocent people
Fearing new ‘red scare,’ Chinese-American activists fight back
US says China is a currency manipulator. What’s next?
The US Treasury Department has officially labeled China a currency manipulator, causing stock markets to plunge around the world. The declaration was made on Monday afternoon, after the Chinese central bank allowed its currency, the yuan, to sink to its weakest level against the US dollar in 11 years. On Monday, the three major US indices ended the trading day about 3% lower. It was the biggest one-day fall of 2019. Asian shares followed suit on Tuesday. Why is this important? The move signals an escalation in the ongoing US-China trade war, which both sides say they’ve been trying to resolve. Last year, Donald Trump imposed tariffs on $250 billion of Chinese imports. He announced new tariff
US says China is a currency manipulator. What’s next?
US, China close to trade truce before G20 meeting
This story is produced jointly by the South China Morning Post and POLITICO, with reporting from Asia and the United States. The world’s top two economies have tentatively agreed to a truce in their trade dispute, as they prepare for talks to resolve the conflict, according to sources familiar with the situation. Details of the deal are being prepared ahead of this weekend’s meeting between the US and Chinese presidents at the Group of 20 leaders summit in Japan, according to three sources. The agreement would avoid a round of tariffs on an additional $300 billion of Chinese imports to the US that the Trump administration had threatened. That would have extended stiff tariffs to nearly all C
US, China close to trade truce before G20 meeting
The cost of shutting the door on Chinese students
As academia becomes the newest battleground in the intensifying rivalry between the United States and China, scholars have raised concerns over the cost of distrust on the American education system. Beijing on Monday warned Chinese students who wish to study in the US of increased visa denials as tensions mount over trade and technology. “This is the next iteration of where this is going as it moves from the economy and security to people-to-people,” said Jude Blanchette, a senior adviser with US-based consultancy Crumpton Group, and author of the book China’s New Red Guard. “Both the US and China are going to weaponize talent. China is not wrong to issue this warning.” Chinese nationals mak
The cost of shutting the door on Chinese students
‘Bring back a wife’: a director comes out to his Chinese parents in Netflix film
Documentarian Hao Wu’s latest film, All in My Family, focuses on Chinese family tradition, gay relationships and children born using surrogacy through an extremely personal lens. The film – set for release on Netflix this Friday – was shot over a series of Lunar New Year trips to Chengdu, in southwest China, from New York, where he settled 20 years ago. We watch him agonize over when and how to tell his grandfather that he’s gay, married to his Chinese-American husband Eric and has two children: a boy and a girl born through surrogacy. “I wanted to show the challenges for gay people of Chinese descent, what kind of cultural and generational barriers and differences they have to negotiate in
‘Bring back a wife’: a director comes out to his Chinese parents in Netflix film