Masha Borak

Masha Borak

Reporter, Technology

Masha Borak is a technology reporter. Before joining the Post, she reported on China tech from Beijing.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
Technology
Chinese people are fed up with widespread use of facial recognition technology
A vast network of cameras across China records the movements of its residents via facial recognition technology. From schools to shopping centers, public transport, concert venues and education campuses, surveillance cameras equipped with facial recognition are omnipresent, even being used to shame jaywalkers and prevent toilet paper theft. It’s also now a fact of life for many Chinese employees who clock into work using biometric technology. But Chinese people are growing increasingly concerned about its use in public spaces.  A survey of 1,515 anonymous Chinese residents by Beijing News Think Tank on Tuesday found that 87.46% of respondents oppose the use of facial recognition technology
A last-minute Christmas gift guide for tech lovers
If technology is baffling and you need help in choosing the perfect Christmas gift. We’ve got you covered. Tech reporters from the South China Morning Post have spent all year “playing” with some of the latest, greatest gadgets and gizmos.  Here are their favorites (all prices are for reference only): This Macbook Air has hit a winning nerve with our staunchest PC-loving editor. I have only ever owned two Apple products – a MacBook Pro and iPad Pro – until the new M1 Macbooks were announced. After reading a deluge of incredible reviews, I picked up the baseline M1 MacBook Air the weekend after it came out.  Having used it for about three weeks now, I can confidently say the hype is real. It
China's digital currency is preparing for takeoff and global dominance
China’s ambitions to launch a sovereign digital currency have moved a step closer after a large-scale US$3 million trial.  The country’s central bank has been pushing toward a cashless future for several years, and this latest pilot, held in December in Suzhou - a major city near Shanghai - was further proof a full nationwide rollout of the digital yuan is not far off.  Organizers said almost 20,000 purchases were made using the digital yuan, known officially as the Digital Currency Electronic Payment (DCEP) in the trial. Unlike bitcoin, the digital yuan is not a cryptocurrency and is issued by China’s central bank, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC).  The currency is designed as a digital v