Mei Fong

Mei Fong

Mei is a columnist at Inkstone. She is a fellow at DC-based think-tank New America Foundation, and was named a top 50 influencer on US-China relations by Foreign Policy magazine. She is a Pulitzer Pri

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‘Go back to your country’ isn’t just racist – it’s shortsighted
I was walking my dog earlier this month when a woman drove by, yelling, “Go back to your country!” Having knocked about many parts of the globe, I’m well equipped to let fly with a ripe riposte. Such exchanges, accompanied with suitably expressive hand gestures, are a thing of the moment and then usually easily forgotten. But this particular insult, at this particular time, is lethal. It stuns, it poisons, and it is unforgettable. We now have in the United States a President who has likened some immigrants to “animals,” rapists and thieves from “shithole” countries, and whose racist zeal has triggered America’s ugliest instincts. Since Trump took office, acts of hate have been on the rise,
‘Go back to your country’ isn’t just racist – it’s shortsighted
The quake that ripped apart China’s dream
By all accounts, 2008 was a banner year for China. For the first time, China was hosting the Olympic Games, that badge of honor that separated what comedian Ali Wong calls “jungle Asian” from “fancy Asian.” “The fancy Asians are the Chinese, the Japanese. They get to do fancy things like host Olympics. Jungle Asians host …diseases.” sniffs Wong. Indeed, in five short years China made the leap from hosting the SARS epidemic to hosting its coming-out party, which was what media had dubbed the Beijing Olympics. The event, set to launch on the auspicious 8.8.08, would mark a milestone for an increasingly open China, one with a burgeoning market for investigative journalism, an active blogosphere
The quake that ripped apart China’s dream
China’s single laddies: bare branches, losers and Buddha men
After International Women’s Day in early March, the talk in China was all about women’s issues. Women are the target of all sorts of campaigns official or commercial: to celebrate or denounce singles, to have more kids, to value daughters. But what about men? Thanks to the lingering effects of the one-child policy and a cultural preference for sons, China is experiencing a bachelor explosion, with some 30 million surplus men, called guanggun or “bare branches.” Yet there’s very little media outcry over this issue. There’s also no official state policy on the matter. Unless China’s single men cause major disruption, they will likely be left to languish with little help Why not? It’s usually s
China’s single laddies: bare branches, losers and Buddha men
The People’s Republic of Childlessness
It’s been two years since China, desperate to stop sagging birth rates, switched to the two-child policy. But instead of a baby boom, there’s been a baby bust. Despite lifted restrictions, birth rates actually fell by 3.5% in 2017. This comes as surprise to no one, least of all women. The methods China’s birth planners used to enact the one-child policy simply don’t work in reverse. Chivvying women – especially college-educated women – to reproduce simply isn’t as easy as forcing farm women to abort. How do you get educated women in China to have more babies? Turning on the baby switch involves a radical rethink. China’s birth planners need to swap sticks for carrots. Here are some ideas: ho
The People’s Republic of Childlessness