Natalie Wong

Natalie Wong

Natalie Wong covers Hong Kong politics, Hong Kong-mainland issues and social policies. Before joining the Post in 2019 as senior reporter, she worked for i-Cable News (HK), BBC Chinese (London) and th

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Front-line activists won big in Hong Kong polls. Beijing is not amused
Beijing could further crack down on Hong Kong’s political opposition ahead of key legislative elections in September, analysts say. Chinese officials have lashed out at organizers of an unofficial primary over the weekend after activists on the front lines of anti-government protests outperformed their rivals in the opposition bloc. Two central government offices overseeing Hong Kong affairs have accused the primary’s organizers of trying to subvert state power in breach of a new national security law. It may portend the mass disqualification of pro-democracy candidates that could lead to further unrest, observers said. “They might see the high turnout as a result of the mobilization of for
A stench of disapproval, but Hong Kong passes national anthem law
Hong Kong’s legislature has passed a contentious bill that will make it illegal to insult the Chinese national anthem, despite attempts by opposition lawmakers to disrupt the vote. The Legislative Council voted 41 to one to pass the legislation on Thursday after foul-smelling liquid was twice released in the chamber and all but one of the city’s “pan-democrat” bloc stood up and abstained from voting in protest. Under the bill, anyone found guilty of misusing or insulting March of the Volunteers, the name of China's anthem, could be jailed for three years or fined up to $6,500. A special administrative region of China that enjoys a degree of autonomy, Hong Kong operates independently in matte
Hong Kong’s protests look like they’re coming back
Hong Kong’s protest leaders have vowed to return to the city’s streets after the arrest of 15 leading opposition figures amid new claims that Beijing was interfering in the city’s internal affairs. The 15 were accused of organizing and taking part in unauthorized marches in August and October last year as part of a wave of anti-government demonstrations that swept the city, initially triggered by a now-withdrawn extradition bill. Their supporters said the arrests were meant to silence dissent and are worried the authorities are hardening their stance, but pro-Beijing figures countered that the police were only doing their job and were not acting politically. Those arrested were former lawmak
Hongkongers say they have themselves to thank for curbing coronavirus
Most people in Hong Kong said they would credit themselves rather than the government for containing the coronavirus in the densely-populated city, a survey commissioned by the South China Morning Post has found. Hong Kong, which borders the mainland Chinese city of Shenzhen, has so far managed to limit the spread of the virus, a success that local epidemiologists have attributed to early social distancing practices, improved personal hygiene and the nearly universal use of face masks. Out of nearly 850 people polled, seven in 10 said they would credit the community response for beating the coronavirus, while more than half objected to the idea of the government being commended for it. The
Hong Kong and Macao are ramping up global travel restrictions
Travelers arriving in Hong Kong from any foreign country from Thursday will be put under 14-day home quarantine or medical surveillance, the city’s leader has said, as she extended a red travel alert to cover all overseas nations.  The new restrictions will not apply to arrivals from Macau or Taiwan. People arriving from mainland China were already required to isolate at home for the past month. Meanwhile, the Macau government announced it would block entry of all non-residents except those from the mainland, Hong Kong and Macau from Wednesday. A mandatory 14-day home quarantine measure for city residents remains effective. Hong Kong and Macau are Special Administrative Regions (SAR) of Chin
China’s new top official in Hong Kong hopes city will 'get back on track'
China’s new top representative to Hong Kong says he hopes the city will “get back on track” soon in his first address to media after his surprise appointment over the weekend.  Luo Huining, 65, the former Communist Party leader of the northern province of Shanxi, has never held any position directly related to Hong Kong before. He is the newly appointed director of the central government’s liaison office in the city.  Hong Kong has been in the grip of protests since June 2019, sparked by a now-withdrawn extradition bill before morphing into a wider anti-government campaign that has been marked by mass rallies and often-violent clashes. Meeting reporters on his first day at work on Monday, Lu