Pavel Toropov

Pavel Toropov

Pavel is a contributor to Inkstone. He has been involved in competitive sport since the age of four and holds a PhD in Ecology. His love of the outdoors sees him setting courses for ultra-marathons in

Bhutan, powder skiing in Japan and guiding tourists to both the North and South Poles.

Tokyo 2020: Chinese Paralympic swimming star finds new challenge in triathlon
Wang Jiachao was born in a remote village in the tropical Chinese province of Yunnan. When he was five, he lost his left arm at the shoulder in an accidental electrocution. Now 27, he is a bonafide star — having won one gold, four silvers and one bronze medal in swimming in three Paralympic Games. Having retired from swimming, he got a bachelor’s and a master’s degree and reinvented himself as a professional triathlete. Now Wang is preparing to fulfill his dream of another Paralympic gold at Tokyo 2020. “I was chosen,” he said of how he became a professional athlete. “One day, county officials came to our village to issue disability certificates. They saw me and said I should go to Kunming t
Tokyo 2020: Chinese Paralympic swimming star finds new challenge in triathlon
Penniless and foreign in China? You could join a ‘white monkey show’
Foreign models and performers can make a pretty good living in China. Securely employed, with contracts and work visas all taken care of, they’re eagerly sought out by big brands and businesses, and enjoy all the benefits of expatriate life in the country’s biggest cities. But in the wilderness of China’s many smaller provincial cities, the picture is different. There, another breed of foreigners, working illegally, appear at bizarre promotional events mockingly called “monkey shows.” The foreigner is a marketing prop – exhibited to be gawked at and photographed, like a monkey in a cage. Yet for new arrivals looking for casual work in China, whose English is too accented or not fluent enough
Penniless and foreign in China? You could join a ‘white monkey show’
He’s 72 and runs a sub-4-hour marathon. Here’s how
Liang Huguo only started running at 70. Now he might be China’s fastest septuagenarian. The 72-year-old runner from China’s southwestern Yunnan province has already run a sub-four-hour marathon, dominates in his age group in China, and is enjoying it all immensely. “We are doing a photo shoot, please give way,” he shouts on the running path along Dianchi Lake in Kunming, Yunnan. He shoos a few staring tourists out of the way, and then strikes up his favorite photo pose: a boxer’s guard.   That’s just one in the repertoire of Liang’s photo poses. Another, which he often does for race photographers at marathons, is posing arms bent at the elbow, both index fingers pointing skywards – like a s
He’s 72 and runs a sub-4-hour marathon. Here’s how