Pearl Liu

Pearl Liu

Reporter, Business

Pearl is a contributor to Inkstone. She covers the property market in Hong Kong and China for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Property
This place has the world’s most expensive parking spot
A parking place in Hong Kong was just sold for nearly $1 million, making it the most expensive parking spot on earth.  The parking bay at The Center, a 73-story Hong Kong office tower that held the 2018 world record as the costliest commercial building ever sold, changed hands recently for HK$7.6 million ($969,000).  Johnny Cheung Shun-yee, one of the 10 investors in the consortium that paid $5.15 billion last year for The Center, told the South China Morning Post that he had sold the last of his four car parks in the tower to someone who owns an office in the same building. “The buyer now needs a car park lot,” Cheung said. He declined to identify the person.  The transaction was made duri
This place has the world’s most expensive parking spot
In Shenzhen, apartments near a collapsed building are in high demand
A collapsed building should be disastrous for home prices, right? Not if you're at the tech hub of Shenzhen. Homeowners at a residential estate in the Chinese megacity where a building collapsed this week raised their prices by nearly 20% within 24 hours of the incident. They bet buyers would be willing to pay a premium in the hope that the entire estate would be razed and redeveloped. A block of flats at the Heping Xinqu residential estate in the bustling Luohu district sank into the ground on August 28. No casualties were reported. The 29-year-old residential area has more than 100 homes. A broker said that a homeowner, who had put his apartment on the market for 3.1 million yuan ($433,300
In Shenzhen, apartments near a collapsed building are in high demand
‘China’s Silicon Valley’ plans to house millions priced out by tech bros
Dubbed “China’s Silicon Valley,” the southern city of Shenzhen is home to some of the country’s biggest tech companies. And just like San Francisco, a tech boom in Shenzhen has been a curse to those who can’t keep up with rising property prices. But in an attempt to calm public discontent over unaffordable housing and to keep attracting talent, the Chinese tech hub said it would build one million subsidized homes by 2035. Shenzhen is seeking to adopt a housing model that, if successful, could be replicated in other major Chinese cities struggling to avert a housing crisis. “Shenzhen would like to be a pioneer seeking a scheme more like Singapore, separating more affordable homes to average i
‘China’s Silicon Valley’ plans to house millions priced out by tech bros
Asia’s priciest address loses a buyer – who loses $4.6 million
A buyer has walked away from the purchase of a luxury house at Asia’s priciest address – losing a deposit of some $4.6 million. The unidentified buyer did not proceed with the transaction for a house on the Mount Nicholson development on Hong Kong Island, according to official documents, after agreeing to buy it for $92 million on December 31. It’s the latest sign of trouble in Hong Kong’s property market – the world’s priciest – which is cooling rapidly after two years of continuous surge. “It is definitely not good news for the market,” said JLL executive director Joseph Tsang. “There are stories about buyers walking away from their purchases every day, but this one is more eye-catching.”
Asia’s priciest address loses a buyer – who loses $4.6 million
How owning a home became the ultimate Chinese dream
Two decades ago, a scholar returned to China from his studies in America. He was bearing a gift: the idea that an ordinary family can own a home.  It was the quintessential American dream. But in the hands of Meng Xiaosu, who would go on to be known as China’s “Godfather of Real Estate,” it would quickly become the quintessential Chinese dream as well. “A friend of mine in the United States told me about their dream – one home, one car,” Meng recalled in an interview with the South China Morning Post. “I believed that owning a car was out of reach at the time in China. But China could have the same home ownership dream.” That was quite an aspiration for the time. The wounds of China’s Cultur
How owning a home became the ultimate Chinese dream