Qin Chen

Qin Chen

Multimedia producer, Inkstone

Qin is a multimedia producer at Inkstone. She was a senior video producer for The New Yorker.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Shanghai dialect
Areas of Expertise
Chinese society and the cultural industry
Why can the US force TikTok to sell?
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. When the US government made overtures about banning the popular app TikTok in the summer of 2020, US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin cited the unanimous support from an obscure interagency committee. Named the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), the high-level panel’s job is to review business and real estate deals involving foreign investment for potential national security threats. As the Chinese-owned app TikTok exploded in popularity in the US, during a time when US-China relations spiraled to new lows, the US government was
China Trends: WeChat ban clouds iPhone use in China and closed mines continue to pollute
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. WeChat or iPhone?  After US President Donald Trump ordered fresh restrictions on the Chinese messaging super-app WeChat on Friday, many in China wondered whether it meant they would have to part ways with Apple. Trump used the power of executive orders to block all US transactions related to WeChat, beginning 45 days later. The order would bar Apple from listing WeChat in its App Store. With US-China relations in their worst state since the two countries restored diplomatic relations in the 70s, technology companies tha
China buys more from Australia despite rising tension
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Index features one important number about China to give you insight into the rising power. 7%: The increase in Chinese imports from Australia in June.  China is importing more goods from Australia despite rising diplomatic tensions between the countries. The rise in Chinese import of Australian materials crucial for China’s infrastructure projects made up for drops in other products Australia exports to China. In May, Beijing slapped tariffs on Australian barley and suspended imports of Australian beef from four producers. The tariffs came after Australia called for an independent probe into the origin of the coronavirus in April, leading some to speculat
How did Taiwan transition to democracy? 
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. When Former Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui died at 97 on July 30, politicians around the world sent their condolences.  US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Lee was crucial in transforming Taiwan into a “beacon of democracy.” Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Lee had brought Taiwan “freedom, democracy, human rights and other universal values.” In mainland China, however, the tone was critical. The reporting of Lee’s passing was condemnatory, because he was regarded by the mainland government as promoting independence for the self-ruled island. T
China Trends: Tap water tainted by sewage and a controversial ban on phones
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. Sewage finds its way into tap water Social media users in China are incensed by reports of water contamination in a village near the eastern city of Hangzhou. Residents of Hubu village on July 26 told local authorities that tap water in their homes was causing diarrhea and allergic skin reactions.  In less than a week, on July 31, investigators traced the contamination to a local waste management center and detained several of its operators. Chinese news site Thepaper.cn reported that 1,600 villagers were affected. The
Meet the Chinese company behind the growing moped sharing scene in the US
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Explains unravels the ideas and context behind the headlines to help you understand news about China. They are fast, quiet, fashionable, and taking over the streets of America. The popularity of electric mopeds has spiked in major US cities in less than a year, driven largely by the popularity of moped sharing services.  Renters jump on mopeds for thrills (it can go up to 30 miles per hour) as well as convenience. The mopeds first caught on in Brooklyn, New York, where its small size and speed make for a convenient alternative to cars, bicycles, or walking. One company that is driving the moped popularity boom is a Chinese startup called NIU Technologies.
How much does India rely on imported goods from China
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Index features one important number about China to give you insight into the rising power. 14%: How much China accounted for India’s overall imports in 2019. Last year, commerce between India and China was worth about US$85 billion, making it Delhi’s second-most fruitful trading relationship, behind only the US.  Nearly one-third of India’s imports from China are electronics, such as smartphones and telecommunications equipment. India also heavily imports materials for nuclear reactors and organic chemicals.  But the close economic ties are under threat after a deadly border conflict in June, igniting wide anti-Chinese sentiment in India. The Indian gover
How much money has China lent to Africa? 
Every Tuesday and Thursday, Inkstone Index features one important number about China to give you insight into the rising power. $147 billion: How much China loaned to Africa from 2000 to 2018.  In less than two decades, China has grown to become the largest lender to sub-Saharan Africa, surpassing the World Bank and the Paris Club.  China’s loans to Africa are lent from the Chinese government, banks and contractors to African governments and their state-owned enterprises.  The investments have helped to lift living standards in the continent. But China’s growing presence in Africa has also alarmed the US and Europe as they jockey for global influence.  China holds loans in 50 of the 54 count
China Trends: WeChat blocks Indian users and a student quits a top college to change major
Every Tuesday and Thursday, China Trends takes the pulse of the Chinese social media to keep you in the loop of what the world’s biggest internet population is talking about. WeChat complies to India’s ban WeChat, China’s messaging super-app owned by Tencent, officially restricted users in India from using the app on Saturday, as a result of India’s ban on WeChat and 58 other Chinese apps in June.  The Indian government banned 59 Chinese apps in late June, including TikTok, WeChat and Baidu maps, saying they threatened India’s “sovereignty and integrity” two weeks after a fatal clash between Chinese and Indian troops at a Himalayan border.  The news prompted concerns on Chinese social media
Why does China have floods almost every summer? 
In the summer of 2020, a large chunk of China was inundated with the most severe flooding the country has seen in years. The deluge came just as China was beginning to return to some semblance of normal after the country had gotten control of the coronavirus within its borders.    Millions of people had to rush to evacuate and leave their homes behind, and businesses that were teetering after the pandemic were dealt another haymaker. In China, like much of the world, seasonal flooding is common, as spring and summer downpours bulge rivers and overwhelm riverbanks, oversaturating the usually-dry soil nearby.  But China has two of the world’s 10 longest rivers – the Yangtze and the Yellow rive