Qin Chen

Qin Chen

Reporter, Inkstone

Qin is a reporter at Inkstone. Previously, she worked in newsrooms across the United States for five years. She was a senior video producer at The New Yorker, a documentary producer at CNBC, and a des

igner at the San Jose Mercury News.

Location
Beijing
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Shanghai dialect
Areas of Expertise
Chinese society
Attacked by a white man, Chinese granny gives nearly US$1 million to fight racism
An elderly Asian woman who beat off a violent attacker on a San Fransisco street has vowed to donate almost US$1 million to end racism in Asian-American communities. Xie Xiaozhen, 76, has pledged the money that was raised on a GoFundMe page set up by her family after the vicious attack that left her badly bruised and bleeding heavily.  Her family said she was donating the money because fighting the problem of racism was “bigger than her.” The March 17 assault on the elderly grandmother made headlines globally when a video of her crying and trying to defend herself against a white male attacker. As of Thursday, the family’s charity page had raised US$962,275 – almost 20 times more than their
Major archeology site discoveries rekindle theories that alien civilization once roamed Earth
A recent discovery at a famous archeology site in China has rekindled fantastical theories that it was once home to a civilization not from earth.  A recent finding of more than 500 artifacts in Sanxingdui, a Bronze Age archeology site in central Sichuan province, included the notable discovery of a gold mask that a priest may have worn.  The mask carries wide-eyes and a deep nose, similar to earlier discoveries of bronze human statues, fueling speculation of alien inhabitants because the features look “foreign.”  In a question list compiled by the state broadcaster CCTV, some people said those bronze face masks looked more like movie characters in Avatar than Han Chinese people.  “Does tha
Chinese comedy show pulls episode after it dunks too hard on basketball players
A popular Chinese comedy show said on Sunday that it would suspend a highly anticipated episode roasting two famous Chinese basketball players after viewers criticized it for being uncomfortably harsh.  The decision from Tencent’s Roast! also highlights the push and pull between China’s state-led sports system and private industry.   On March 14, the show aired the first half of a series roasting Chinese National Team basketball players Guo Ailun and Zhou Qi. The two players were part of a team that faced intense domestic criticism after their lackluster performance at the 2019 FIBA Basketball World Cup, one of the most important international tournaments in the sport. China flamed out in th
Bullied and sexually assaulted for months, school tells gay high school student to ‘deal with it’
When Xiaohao, a pseudonym, was a freshman in high school, his peers spent months bullying him emotionally and physically, including repeated instances of sexual assault. All because he is gay.  In the most harrowing incident, Xiaohao was stripped naked, pinned to the ground and forced to watch pornography while someone stimulated his genitals. The bullies filmed the incident.  He remembered one of the abusers asked, “Shouldn’t this give you pleasure since you are gay?”  Xiaohao, who made his experience public last Saturday, routinely asked for help from the school administrators, who told him to endure it.  “I am a homosexual. My dorm-mates bullied me. But the teachers asked me to put up wit
A court ruling might help Chinese women to enjoy more maternity leave
A company that fired a woman for taking too much maternity leave must pay her salary compensation and severance pay, a Chinese court ruled in a hearing made public on March 3. Legal experts said the ruling signals a desire by authorities to enforce maternal leave policies in the hope that it encourages more people to have children.  China faces a demographics crisis that got far more urgent in 2020 after the government recorded a 15% decrease in newborns registered its hukou housing system.  The woman, surnamed Zhong, had worked in the company for seven years before going on maternity leave in May 2019.  Three months later, the company discharged her because they said she was not showing up
Three quirky stories from China to bring a bit of joy to life
What would life be without people being weird, wonderful and wacky?  Sure, dreams and goals are important, but life will be terribly dull if we don’t take a breath to enjoy the whimsy surrounding us.  These people China have completely embraced this ethos, making waves by mastering a slingshot, a street workout guru who makes the natural environment his gym and hotels in Hangzhou that installed computer chips to clean clothes.  They brought joy to millions of people along the way.  The Chinese slingshot master A Chinese man named Zhu Liang could hit moving water droplets from a distance with a slingshot. Zhu has developed a special type of slingshot to hone his precision chop and plans to t
China may not be able to stop overwork culture even if it wants
Legally, China promises to cultivate a healthy work-life balance. Labor laws limit employees to work 8 hours a day, or 44 hours per week, with overtime limited to 36 hours per month.   The reality is the polar opposite. Many workers in China are subject to a grueling work culture that is so ingrained it is drawing serious concern from Chinese lawmakers.  But people are doubtful that the “996” culture - working from 9am to 9pm for 6 days per week - will change anytime soon.  One official, Li Guohua, a deputy of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), suggested that regulators should clamp down on the overwork culture and “show their teeth” to companies participating i
Can mandatory university courses cure toxic relationships?
A Chinese lawmaking official has suggested that the country consider mandatory marriage and dating courses in universities to reduce tragedies caused by toxic relationships.  Yu Xinwei, a legislative deputy from the National People’s Congress, China’s legislature, said college students are less likely to commit “extreme acts” with “a proper understanding of love and relationships.” The proposal comes as a series of high-profile homicides and suicides have captured society’s attention.   In October 2019, a female student from the esteemed school Peking University killed herself after her boyfriend repeatedly humiliated her because she had had sex before meeting him. Some Chinese men still con
China's mandatory sex education might start with sexual assault prevention course
As China begins to overhaul how the country learns about sex in school, a flurry of new proposals suggests that educating children about sexual assault will be a top priority.  On Tuesday, two days ahead of the “two-sessions,” China’s all-important legislative meeting, several lawmaking deputies put forward proposals that would require all primary and middle schools to teach sexual assault deterrent classes. The proposals are follow-ups on a revision of a law protecting minors that will require schools and pre-schools to provide children “age-appropriate” sex education. The law will take effect on June 1. For the most part, the proposals said boys and girls would be taught the sexual assaul
Being gay in China: One man is shedding light on the plight of homosexual teachers
When Cui Le, a Chinese university lecturer, publically came out as homosexual in 2015, he wanted to show a young woman that people in China supported her and remind her that she was not alone.  He could not have predicted the severity of the oppression, ostracisation and emotional despair he would go through. And yet, not only does he have no regrets, he is shining a light on gay teachers in China, providing a rare glimpse into a community that is seldom discussed in society.  Cui came out to support a lesbian student from the Sun Yat-sen University, who was known as Qiu Bai. She was suing the education ministry for allowing some textbooks to describe homosexuality as a “mental disease.”  S