Qin Chen

Qin Chen

Qin is a multimedia producer at Inkstone. Most recently, she was a senior video producer for The New Yorker’s video team. Prior to that she was at CNBC, making short documentaries and writing about ho

w technology shapes lives.

Chinese student who died of malnutrition never received bulk of donations
A Chinese charity has come under fire after it admitted that a large amount of money donated by the public did not reach a poverty-stricken college student suffering from complications due to malnutrition. She eventually died. The case of Wu Huayan, 24, who became ill because she had been subsisting on only rice and pickled-peppers for years, highlighted the challenges that China faces in its drive to eradicate poverty by 2020, which is a major policy goal for the Communist Party.  China has managed to successfully pull a large portion of its population out of poverty since it began market reforms in the late 1970s. However, the country now has one of the most unequal economies in the world,
Chinese student who died of malnutrition never received bulk of donations
China’s high-speed trains go ticket-less to aid New Year’s travelers
China’s peak holiday travel season, often billed as the “the world’s biggest annual human migration,” has just kicked off. The season usually begins about two weeks before the Lunar New Year's Day, which falls on January 25 this year, and lasts around six weeks. Also called the Spring Festival, the holiday is the most important time of the year for families to get together, eat huge amounts of food and grill single relatives about their romantic prospects. In order to ease the epic annual travel crunch – a massive 3 billion in total trips, compared to the relatively puny 55 million Americans who traveled last Thanksgiving – the country’s sole railway operator has introduced electronic ticket
China’s high-speed trains go ticket-less to aid New Year’s travelers
Is ‘The Farewell’ problematic? For some in China, the answer is yes
The Farewell, an autobiographical film about a Chinese-American woman, has won rave reviews in the US and earned its leading actress, Awkwafina, a history-making Best Actress win at the Golden Globes. The much-lauded movie has a 98% “Certified Fresh” rating on Rotten Tomatoes. In comparison, on Douban, a popular review site in China, just 60% of the audience gave it a positive review.  Some viewers applauded the film for giving non-Chinese viewers an accessible introduction to a rich, complex culture. But many comments were highly critical, with some viewers going so far as to say they found some of the scenes offensive. The unfavorable reviews, from moviegoers who have watched the film thr
Is ‘The Farewell’ problematic? For some in China, the answer is yes
Why ‘Star Wars’ bombs in China again and again
The latest Star Wars movie has raked in more than $175 million in its opening weekend in North America, putting it on course to be one of the top-grossing films of the year. But in China, the blockbuster performed poorly, taking in only $12 million, a fraction of what other Disney franchises, such as the Avengers and Frozen, brought in. This is not the first time Star Wars tanked in the world’s second-biggest film market. When Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi, the prequel to this year's movie, opened in China, it had a disappointing first weekend.  The last four Star Wars movies made $250 million in China, which is only a bit better than the $200 million Spider-Man: Far From Home made
Why ‘Star Wars’ bombs in China again and again
Canada wants no US-China trade deal until detained citizens released
In what could complicate efforts to end a trade war between the world’s two largest economies, the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said the US should not strike a final deal with China until two Canadians detained in the country are released. “We’ve said that the United States should not sign a final and complete agreement with China that does not settle the question of Meng Wanzhou and the two Canadians,” Trudeau said in an interview with TVA, a French-language Canadian TV network, according to the Associated Press. The Canadians, the former diplomat Michael Kovrig and businessman Michael Spavor, have been detained in China for more than a year, officially on national security groun
Canada wants no US-China trade deal until detained citizens released
The most competitive cities: China vs rest of the world
By ranking fourth in the world, the megacity of Shenzhen was the highest-ranking Chinese metropolis in a new study that ranked how important a city is to the global economy.  China generally performed well in the rankings, but the list was dominated by the US.  New York City topped the chart for the third consecutive year. London took the second spot, followed by Singapore and Shenzhen. San Jose, California took fifth and Tokyo was sixth.  The report, which was produced by the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the United Nations Human Settlements Program, measured a city’s economic influence based on its “connectivity.” Connectivity was defined by both “hard” and “soft” networks.  The
The most competitive cities: China vs rest of the world
China’s ‘Mad Dog’ fighter enters the battle of his life
The 41-year-old mixed martial arts fighter Xu Xiaodong has been a controversial figure in China ever since he became famous for beating up what he called “fake” kung fu masters. Unafraid to talk about almost anything, his brash attitude has brought him stardom but also unexpected – and unwelcome – knocks on his door. In November, he set out to prove that he’s more than a tough guy who dared to challenge a cherished Chinese tradition. In the video above, Inkstone follows Xu, nicknamed “Mad Dog,” as he fights the biggest fights of his career, for fame and freedom.  Subscribe to our YouTube channel for more stories about life, culture and politics in China.
China’s ‘Mad Dog’ fighter enters the battle of his life
To fight the war on poverty, China seeks help from online influencers
In 2015, the Chinese government began what a senior official called an “extremely difficult” mission: to eradicate poverty in five years, including by using unconventional means. As the 2020 deadline looms, grinding poverty still exists in China. One Chinese province is certainly using an unorthodox way to help fix the problem.  The southern province of Hunan, ranked the eighth poorest in the country, has tapped into the growing popularity of live streams – and the influencers behind them – to meet ambitious poverty alleviation goals.  Enter Ah Juan, 36, whose real name is He Yujuan. She has doe eyes, porcelain skin and 1.9 million followers on Douyin, the Chinese version of short video app
 To fight the war on poverty, China seeks help from online influencers
Chinese transgender woman sues ex-employer in landmark case
A transgender woman in China is suing her former employer in a landmark case that many hope will uphold equal employment rights for sexual minorities. Earlier this year, shortly after the woman, surnamed Yang, returned to work at a media company from gender-reassignment surgery, she was advised to quit. She didn’t. Within a month, she was fired.  The woman is suing in the eastern city of Hangzhou under a new legal provision added to Chinese law in December 2018 mandating equal employment rights. Yang is seeking a public apology and modest compensation.  The employer said the woman was fired due to lateness. Legal experts say Yang’s case, which was heard in court last week, has blazed a trai
Chinese transgender woman sues ex-employer in landmark case
Nintendo Switch finally launches in China. But will it be a hit?
Nintendo has just launched its wildly popular Switch game console in China, more than two years after its global release. But in a country with the largest number of gamers in the world, Switch is facing some unique challenges. Gaming experts say Chinese gamers favor mobile phones and computers (not consoles like Switch) and the pace of introducing new games for Switch is slow due to existing regulations. On top of that, players in China won’t be able to play against gamers in other countries, due to region-locking. Chinese gamers can buy a Nintendo Switch bundle for 2,099 yuan ($298), which includes a copy of New Super Mario Bros. U Deluxe. Titles like Mario Kart 8 Deluxe and Super Mario Od
Nintendo Switch finally launches in China. But will it be a hit?