Rachel Cheung

Rachel Cheung

Reporter, Culture

Rachel is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a culture reporter for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Shanghai
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Culture, Arts, Beauty
A moment of connection in a summer of rage gave me strength
There are nights when I cannot sleep; the slogan chanting and cries of panic keep ringing in my ears. There are mornings when I cannot wake up, fearing I’ll open my eyes to a world that has gone further down the slippery slope. Then there are days when I do nothing but cry. At least I am releasing these emotions, I tell myself. For others, who are so caught up in the news cycle, it is a luxury they may not have. The daily news is filled with stories of how Hong Kong residents, protesters and law enforcers alike are suffering from the political turmoil and unrest that has gripped the city for the past few months. Seldom discussed, or even acknowledged, is the mental toll this is taking on tho
A moment of connection in a summer of rage gave me strength
Literary award renamed after Hong Kong author calls out ‘fascist’ writer
A leading American literary magazine has dropped the name of the late sci-fi writer John W. Campbell from a major award after a Hong Kong author slammed him as a “fascist” while receiving the honor. “John W. Campbell, for whom this award was named, was a f**king fascist,” Hong Kong-born writer Jeannette Ng said in her acceptance speech in Dublin last Sunday. Through his control of the influential sci-fi magazine Astounding Science Fiction as editor, Ng said, Campbell was “responsible for setting a tone for science fiction that haunts the genre to this day. Stale. Sterile. Male. White,” 33-year-old Ng said.  Campbell launched the careers of some of the most notable names in sci-fi writing, in
Literary award renamed after Hong Kong author calls out ‘fascist’ writer
Blood, brains and more hotpot gems
The Chinese aren’t wasteful when it comes to food. There’s barely a part of an animal that won’t be eaten, somehow. In the colder months, many of the more unusual (well, unusual in the West) parts make their way to hotpot – thin slices of meat and vegetables cooked by diners at the table in a variety of simmering broths. Offal, including the stomach, intestines, blood and brains can all end up as hotpot ingredients. Some are prized for their texture, some for their taste… and some are said to be good to you. They may not look like the most appetizing thing on the menu, but ordering these items shows you’re a true nose-to-tail hotpot connoisseur.
Blood, brains and more hotpot gems
Samsung announces collab with Supreme. One problem: it’s a fake brand
Any marketing person worth their salt knows it’s not a product launch without a surprise or two. So when Samsung launched its new Galaxy A8s smartphone in Beijing on Monday, it thought it had a real win: a crossover sure to bring in that coveted 18-35 demographic.   The tech giant had announced a collaboration with none other than streetwear brand Supreme. But it didn’t take long for fans to discover that the partnership was not with the New York skateboard brand – but with a company that makes counterfeit Supreme gear. Meet the CEOs Towards the end of the launch event, Samsung China’s head of digital marketing Feng En invited two men on stage. He introduced them as the CEOs of Supreme. Th
Samsung announces collab with Supreme. One problem: it’s a fake brand
How to furnish a home from a smartphone in China
Online shopping has grown so big in China that everything is just a click away. Electronics, home goods and even live animals can all be bought just with a few taps on a smartphone. Thomas Yau, a South China Morning Post reporter who has just moved to Shanghai, wants to do just that. Together with his colleague Rachel Cheung, he sets out to transform his spartan apartment into a luxe pad – using only his smartphone. Check out the video, above, to see how he did.
How to furnish a home from a smartphone in China
The luxe cream that heals burns… but only in China
The history books are full of Chinese emperors who have died after taking elixirs intended to grant health and immortality. Obviously, none these fabled concoctions held the secret of eternal life. Now one product on sale in modern China may be overselling its own curative properties.   A well-known Chinese beauty blogger says he is suing global conglomerate Estée Lauder for making false claims about Crème de la Mer in China. In a blog post on China’s Twitter-like Weibo, Hao Yu said he had filed a civil lawsuit in Shanghai on September 27. It accuses Estée Lauder of misleading and deceiving Chinese consumers by claiming that its Crème de la Mer product can heal burn scars. Hao, whose blog n
The luxe cream that heals burns… but only in China
How it’s made: soup dumplings
Shanghainese food is one of the world’s greatest cuisines, and there’s one dish in particular that stands above the rest: xiaolongbao soup dumplings. Biting into these pork-filled treats releases a rich, piping-hot broth that inevitably catches out unsuspecting diners. Shanghai’s Wanshouzai has been hand-making soup dumplings for at least six decades. Here’s how this humble dumpling joint has stood the test of time in modern Shanghai.
How it’s made: soup dumplings
Taiwan demands correction after Cannes calls a Taiwanese actor ‘Chinese’
The Cannes Film Festival is one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious film festivals, and it prides itself on its international lineup. Still, that doesn’t mean it’s immune from diplomatic blunders. In announcing its 2018 jury on Wednesday, the festival’s organizers called Taiwanese actor Chang Chen a “Chinese actor.” The apparent mix-up has prompted a request for a correction from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Taiwan, Taiwan’s Central News Agency reported. Foreign governments and international institutions routinely come under pressure from the Chinese government not to recognize self-ruling, democratic Taiwan as a state but as part of China. Earlier this month, The Man Booker In
Taiwan demands correction after Cannes calls a Taiwanese actor ‘Chinese’