Raquel Carvalho

Raquel Carvalho

Asia Correspondent

Raquel is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter with the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Spanish, Portuguese
Areas of Expertise
Human rights, migration, security, corruption
She was diagnosed with cervical cancer – so she was fired
Less than a month after Baby Jane Allas was diagnosed with stage-three cervical cancer, she received another blow. On February 17, while the 38-year-old woman was on paid medical leave prescribed by a Hong Kong government doctor, Allas was given a dismissal letter. Her employers were terminating her contract because of her illness. Still shaken by the diagnosis and her unemployment, Allas said: “I feel so upset… My main concern is: how am I going to get medical care and the meds I need?” Foreign domestic workers who are fired need to leave Hong Kong within two weeks. They also lose their right of access to free medical care, which all residents of the city are entitled to. An unseen backbon
She was diagnosed with cervical cancer – so she was fired
From domestic worker to photographer: breaking a relentless cycle
In the late 1990s Georgia Bacani left her three children, aged between 2 and 8, behind. She had been working doing laundry by hand for her village in Nueva Vizcaya, the Philippines. But it wasn’t enough to put food on the table and pay for her children’s education. And so Bacani, now 49, decided to leave home and become a foreign domestic worker in Singapore. “We were very, very poor and I wanted to give my children a better life,” she says. “Life was really hard and migration was the only option.” After a few years in Singapore, Georgia took a job in Hong Kong in 1999. She was eventually joined by her eldest daughter, Xyza Cruz Bacani, and has remained in the city ever since. Hong Kong has
From domestic worker to photographer: breaking a relentless cycle
Ex-CIA officer charged with espionage will plead not guilty
China is alleged to have given the accused spy Jerry Chun Shing Lee a cash gift of $100,000 and promised it would “take care of him for life,” according to court documents. The Hong Kong-born Lee, who was a CIA officer between 1994 and 2007, is also alleged to have deposited hundreds of thousands of dollars more in illicit payments from his Chinese handlers into his personal bank accounts in Hong Kong. He is scheduled to be arraigned in a federal court in Virginia on Friday, where he is expected to plead not guilty to one count of conspiracy to gather or deliver national defence information to aid a foreign government, as well as two counts of unlawful retention of national defence informati
Ex-CIA officer charged with espionage will plead not guilty