Shi Jiangtao

Shi Jiangtao

Reporter, China

Jiangtao is a contributor to Inkstone. He is a China correspondent for the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin
Areas of Expertise
China news
Can the US and China avoid stumbling into armed conflict?
When senior Chinese and American diplomats met in Hawaii last month, for the first time in nearly a year, the stakes were unusually high amid fears their acrimonious tensions are drifting imperceptibly towards war. The secret meeting between US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Yang Jiechi, the top diplomatic aide to Chinese President Xi Jinping, took place at Pearl Harbor. The military base was the scene of a pivotal moment for the US and world history when it was bombed by the Japanese nearly 80 years ago. The two superpowers are decoupling their economic and technological cooperation amid an unfolding new Cold War. Beijing and Washington have engaged in a global blame-game over the deadl
Did China miscalculate the rise of India?
While China’s attention was fixed on a new Cold War with the United States, tensions on its troubled Himalayan border with India erupted last month in the deadliest clash in over 50 years. The fatal skirmish rubbed salt into an old wound that has refused to heal since the 1962 border war, and raised questions about China’s strategic calculations about the rise of India. It also prompted fears about armed conflicts, and worries that the nuclear powers may find themselves in a deadly manifestation of the Thucydides Trap. The much-debated concept, which was coined by Harvard professor Graham Allison in reference to the possibility of military confrontations when a rising power threatens a domin
Inevitable war? China, America and their next battlegrounds
When thousands of China’s elites flock to Beijing for the delayed national legislative session starting on Friday, they will face a renewed debate about relations with the US. Specifically, can armed conflict between the two economic superpowers be avoided?  The question has taken a new urgency as acrimony escalates between Washington and Beijing amid the Covid-19 pandemic. The question is also known as the Thucydides trap: an ancient Greek analogy that Harvard professor Graham Allison has popularized. In his 2017 book, Allison argued that wars were often unavoidable when a rising power challenges a ruling power. While observers mostly agree that an all-out war between the nuclear-armed nati
China’s aggressive diplomacy may be backfiring
China’s diplomats are fighting an uphill battle to fend off intensifying criticism from Beijing’s critics of the country’s initial mishandling of the coronavirus pandemic. In recent weeks, some of the country’s most seasoned ambassadors have found themselves engaged in a war of words with their host countries.  But rather than adopting the traditional approach of managing tensions through diplomatic protocols, many of them have risen to the call of Chinese President Xi Jinping and displayed their “fighting spirit” – often at the expense of China’s global image, pundits say. Last week alone, at least seven Chinese ambassadors – to France, Kazakhstan, Nigeria, Kenya, Uganda, Ghana and the Afri
The post-coronavirus world doesn’t look good for China
The new coronavirus has killed over 200,000 people and nearly ground the global economy to a halt. The next ripple effect could be a new Cold War, this time between China and the United States. Although it remains unclear when and how the pandemic will end, Beijing is preparing for an international backlash of blame over the disease outbreak and appears ready to push back, according to analysts. Chinese authorities have kick-started an internal process to solicit advice from think tanks, academics and others on how to deal with an increasingly adversarial global environment, said a government adviser who declined to give his name. At the same time, the devastating human toll and suffering c
The coronavirus has revealed an absence of global leadership
Olga Jonas worked as an economic adviser at the World Bank at a time when hundreds of staff focused on the global threats from climate change.  During the same period, as few as two people were looking at risks from disease pandemics. Jonas was one of them. She spent seven years at the bank coordinating the organization’s response to global avian and pandemic flu threats between 2006 and 2013, and it was an uphill fight to get attention, according to a report she wrote for the International Monetary Fund in 2014. “Although a recent World Bank report identified pandemics as one of the three major global risks – together with climate change and financial crises – most official discussions, re
‘Do not travel to the US’: China hits back at American ‘overreaction’ to coronavirus
Beijing has warned Chinese citizens not to travel to the United States, in what analysts said is a political move that will worsen already heightened tensions between the two powers. In a travel advisory released on Monday, China’s Ministry of Culture and Tourism cautioned against visiting the US, citing its “overreaction” to the coronavirus outbreak and the “unfair treatment” Chinese tourists received in the country. “Do not travel to the US,” the ministry said in a notice. This appeared to be a direct response to Washington’s decision nearly a month ago to deny entry to foreigners who have been to China within the past 14 days.  Since the outbreak, more than 60 countries have imposed some
Coronavirus outbreak inadvertently cut China’s carbon emissions
China, the world’s largest carbon emitter, may have seen its first decline in greenhouse gas emissions in three years as the coronavirus outbreak has shut down much of the country, a new study has found. The study, released on Wednesday by the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air in Finland, said that coronavirus has temporarily reduced China’s carbon emissions by a quarter.  Since mid-January, China has placed cities and towns of tens of millions of people on lockdown to contain the coronavirus. These restrictive policies have resulted in repeated delays in industrial operations and a sharp reduction in energy demand. China accounts for more than one-fourth of the world’s total gree
As Trump wars with China, Chinese-Americans are caught in the middle
Ethnic Chinese in the United States fear they may become collateral damage as tensions flare between Beijing and Washington. Many prominent Chinese-Americans have complained that they are subject to tighter scrutiny as a result of the tit-for-tat trade confrontation and mounting allegations about Beijing’s overseas influence activities that have unfairly called their loyalty into question. “Chinese-Americans are vulnerable and we are caught in the middle,” said Chi Wang, chairman of the Washington-based US-China Policy Foundation. Wang, a professor at Georgetown University and the former head of the China section at the Library of Congress, said it was sad to see his “Chineseness” used to s
Forget trade: is the US out to get China?
For nearly two weeks, China’s top leaders disappeared from public view as they gathered at a secluded beach resort this month. The agenda at Beidaihe, a Camp David-like retreat for the political elite, was likely dominated by a single subject. The trade war with the United States – and the emerging view that the dispute goes beyond trade and economic matters. Even as China’s commerce vice-minister Wang Shouwen holds talks with his counterparts in DC on Wednesday – talks Donald Trump has said he doesn’t have high hopes for — there are signs that Beijing sees the trade conflict as part of Washington’s design to temper China’s rise to greater power. China’s earlier optimism of finding a quick s