Shirley Zhao

Shirley Zhao

Reporter, Hong Kong 

Shirley is a contributor to Inkstone. She is a reporter for the Hong Kong desk of the South China Morning Post.

Location
Hong Kong
Language spoken
English, Mandarin, Cantonese
Areas of Expertise
Housing, land, planning, education, cross-border issues
Hong Kong’s ‘king of votes’ banned from village election
Pro-democracy lawmaker Eddie Chu is called Hong Kong’s “king of votes,” winning in 2016 more voter support than anyone else in the semi-autonomous Chinese city’s legislative elections that year. But in the run-up to an obscure village election next month, Chu has proved no match for an unelected bureaucrat, who disqualified Chu from running based on his political stance. A returning officer, who is tasked with screening candidates in the January election, has barred Chu from running in a rural representative election in northern Hong Kong. The officer, Enoch Yuen, said that Chu had “implicitly” supported “independence as an option for Hong Kong people.” The move against Chu is the first time
Hong Kong’s ‘king of votes’ banned from village election
Police find a professor’s missing wife… in a suitcase in his office
A professor at the prestigious University of Hong Kong has been arrested over the murder of his wife, whose body was found in a suitcase in his office. Police did not name the academic, but sources identified him to the South China Morning Post as Associate Professor Cheung Kie-chung, from the university’s department of mechanical engineering. He was arrested on Tuesday after the decomposing body of his 52-year-old wife was discovered in his office on campus, according to a police source. He is being held for questioning, and has yet to be charged. Superintendent Law Kwok-hoi of the Hong Kong Police has said the identity of the victim still needed to be confirmed by an autopsy. The victim w
Police find a professor’s missing wife… in a suitcase in his office
Hong Kong’s churches confront sexual harassment
A church is a place of vulnerability: a place to expose your weaknesses. You don’t expect the man in change to take advantage of that very vulnerability and weakness. But a survey of Hong Kong Protestants has thrown up 55 sexual harassment cases in churches, half of them allegedly committed by pastors or church leaders. The survey, released on Sunday by the Hong Kong Christian Council, came after a Hong Kong pastor was accused of taking sexual advantage of women with whom he had built paternal relationships. Pastor Ngai Lap-yin, who was fired two months ago from Hong Kong’s Brotherly Love Swatow Baptist Church, admitted on Friday that he behaved “inappropriately” and harmed women from the ch
Hong Kong’s churches confront sexual harassment