Stephanie Ma

Stephanie Ma

Stephanie Ma is an intern reporter at Inkstone.

Language spoken
English, Cantonese
The public relations arm of Hong Kong’s protest movement
When protests in Hong Kong against a now-abandoned extradition bill started in June, illustrator Chris Wong, 24, decided to use his artistic talents to support them. From designing poster art to writing copy in English and Chinese, Wong and his fellow artists comprise the public relations arm of the leaderless anti-government movement, which is now in its 11th week. They are responsible for much of the protest art circulating on social media or posted to walls of sticky notes, called Lennon Walls. “I’m new to politics,” Wong said. “I didn’t participate much in the 2014 protests, which was something I deeply regretted because they failed to achieve the aim of universal suffrage. If I didn’t d
The public relations arm of Hong Kong’s protest movement
Hong Kong protests: dreaming, gaming and other euphemisms
Week after week since June, Hong Kong’s protesting youth have taken to the streets to demand accountability and democracy from a government that doesn’t seem to be listening. You might call them “dreamers.” As peaceful protests escalated into a full-blown, sometimes violent, anti-government movement, demonstrators have turned to the use of code words to describe what they’re doing. “Dreaming” and “sleepwalking” have emerged as two of the euphemisms most used by protesters to describe unauthorized gatheringsin an attempt to stay out of legal trouble.  As the Beijing-backed Hong Kong authorities have vowed to ramp up arrests and prosecution of the protesters, their attempts to mask themselves
Hong Kong protests: dreaming, gaming and other euphemisms
A tale of two Hong Kong protests
In Hong Kong’s Victoria Park, under the searing afternoon sun, a huge crowd set off on a peaceful march on Monday, waving banners and chanting slogans. At the same time, about a mile and a half away, a smaller group of masked protesters tried to storm the city’s legislature by ramming the building’s reinforced windows with a metal cart and rods. July 1 marks the official day that Hong Kong was handed over to China, in 1997. It’s a day of both official celebration of the ex-British colony’s return to Chinese rule, and of demonstrations over wider grievances against the government as well as concerns about Beijing’s tightening grip on the city. The clashing values of the anniversary were on fu
A tale of two Hong Kong protests
Jackie Chan dined with two stars. Hong Kong is not amused
Taiwanese megastar Jay Chou and X Japan leader Yoshiki are facing a backlash for hanging out with Jackie Chan. Chou and Yoshiki were panned on social media by their fans after they shared pictures of themselves having dinner with Chan on Wednesday. While the Hong Kong-born actor is widely adored globally for his kung-fu movies, Chan is spurned by many at home in Hong Kong for being pro-Beijing and dismissive toward the city’s aspiration for democracy.         View this post on Instagram                   祝大哥新專輯大賣 @jackiechan A post shared by Jay Chou 周杰倫 (@jaychou) on Jun 12, 2019 at 7:33am PDT The musicians’ association with Chan didn’t sit well with their fans as Hong K
Jackie Chan dined with two stars. Hong Kong is not amused